An investigation of the relationship between antioxidant vitamin intake and coronary heart disease in men and women using discriminant analysis

Susan Todd, Mark Woodward, Caroline Bolton-Smith, Hugh Tunstall-Pedoe

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Smoking, high blood pressure and elevated blood cholesterol are the well-established 'classical' risk factors for coronary heart disease (CHD) in men and women. However, it is also well-known that there is a considerable degree of residual variation in CHD after these factors have been taken into account. Consideration of antioxidant vitamin status may help to reduce this unexplained variation. Here, discriminant analysis is applied to the baseline cross-sectional data from the Scottish Heart Health Study. The problem of possible behavioural changes after diagnosis for CHD is addressed by analysing diagnosed and undiagnosed CHD cases separately. Results show that the combined dietary intakes of the antioxidant vitamins C, E and carotene (assessed using a food frequency questionnaire) differentiate CHD prevalence as well as do the classical risk factors. For women, stepwise discriminant analysis shows that the effect of the antioxidant vitamins on CHD is removed by adjustment for the classical risk factors and age. For men, however, the antioxidant vitamins still contribute to the discriminant function. It is concluded that dietary antioxidant vitamins appear to have a significant effect on the prevalence of CHD, especially amongst men. The benefits and problems of using discriminant analysis in this practical context are discussed, including the assumptions that need to be tested.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)297-305
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Clinical Epidemiology
Volume48
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1995
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Antioxidant vitamins
  • Blood pressure
  • Cholesterol Coronary
  • Discriminant analysis
  • Food frequency questionnaire
  • Smoking
  • heart disease

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology

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