An investigation of the psychological effects of the September 11, 2001, attacks on New York City

Developing and implementing research in the acute postdisaster period

Sandro Galea, David Vlahov, Heidi Resnick, Dean Kilpatrick, Michael J. Bucuvalas, Mark D. Morgan, Joel Gold

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The September 11, 2001, attack on New York City was the largest human-made disaster in United States history. In the first few days after the attack, it became clear that the scope of the attacks (including loss of life, property damage, and financial strain) was unprecedented and that the attacks could result in substantial psychological sequelae in the city population. Researchers at the Center for Urban Epidemiologic Studies at the New York Academy of Medicine designed and implemented an assessment of the mental health of New Yorkers 5-8 weeks after the attacks. To implement this research in the immediate postdisaster period researchers at the center had to develop, in a compressed time interval, new academic collaborations, links with potential funders, and unique safeguards for study respondents who may have been suffering from acute psychological distress. Results of the assessment contributed to a New York state mental health needs assessment that secured Federal Emergency Management Agency funding for mental health programs in New York City. This experience suggests that mechanisms should be in place for rapid implementation of mental health assessments after disasters.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)585-587+593
JournalCNS Spectrums
Volume7
Issue number8
StatePublished - Aug 1 2002
Externally publishedYes

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Mental Health
Psychology
Disasters
Research
Research Personnel
Needs Assessment
Epidemiologic Studies
Emergencies
History
Medicine
Population

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology

Cite this

Galea, S., Vlahov, D., Resnick, H., Kilpatrick, D., Bucuvalas, M. J., Morgan, M. D., & Gold, J. (2002). An investigation of the psychological effects of the September 11, 2001, attacks on New York City: Developing and implementing research in the acute postdisaster period. CNS Spectrums, 7(8), 585-587+593.

An investigation of the psychological effects of the September 11, 2001, attacks on New York City : Developing and implementing research in the acute postdisaster period. / Galea, Sandro; Vlahov, David; Resnick, Heidi; Kilpatrick, Dean; Bucuvalas, Michael J.; Morgan, Mark D.; Gold, Joel.

In: CNS Spectrums, Vol. 7, No. 8, 01.08.2002, p. 585-587+593.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Galea, S, Vlahov, D, Resnick, H, Kilpatrick, D, Bucuvalas, MJ, Morgan, MD & Gold, J 2002, 'An investigation of the psychological effects of the September 11, 2001, attacks on New York City: Developing and implementing research in the acute postdisaster period', CNS Spectrums, vol. 7, no. 8, pp. 585-587+593.
Galea, Sandro ; Vlahov, David ; Resnick, Heidi ; Kilpatrick, Dean ; Bucuvalas, Michael J. ; Morgan, Mark D. ; Gold, Joel. / An investigation of the psychological effects of the September 11, 2001, attacks on New York City : Developing and implementing research in the acute postdisaster period. In: CNS Spectrums. 2002 ; Vol. 7, No. 8. pp. 585-587+593.
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