An intronic ABCA3 mutation that is responsible for respiratory disease

Amit Agrawal, Aaron Hamvas, F. Sessions Cole, Jennifer A. Wambach, Daniel Wegner, Carl Coghill, Keith Harrison, Lawrence Nogee

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Introduction: Member A3 of the ATP-binding cassette family of transporters (ABCA3) is essential for surfactant metabolism. Nonsense, missense, frameshift, and splice-site mutations in the ABCA3 gene (ABCA3) have been reported as causes of neonatal respiratory failure (NRF) and interstitial lung disease. We tested the hypothesis that mutations in noncoding regions of ABCA3 may cause lung disease. Methods: ABCA3-specific cDNA was generated and sequenced from frozen lung tissue from a child with fatal lung disease with only one identified ABCA3 mutation. ABCA3 was sequenced from genomic DNA prepared from blood samples obtained from the proband, parents, and other children with NRF. Results: ABCA3 cDNA from the proband contained sequences derived from intron 25 that would be predicted to alter the structure and function of the ABCA3 protein. Genomic DNA sequencing revealed a heterozygous C>T transition in intron 25 trans to the known mutation, creating a new donor splice site. Seven additional infants with an ABCA3-deficient phenotype and inconclusive genetic findings had this same variant, which was not found in 2,132 control chromosomes. Discussion: These findings support that this variant is a disease-causing mutation that may account for additional cases of ABCA3 deficiency with negative genetic studies.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)633-637
Number of pages5
JournalPediatric Research
Volume71
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2012

Fingerprint

Mutation
Respiratory Insufficiency
Introns
Lung Diseases
Complementary DNA
RNA Splice Sites
ATP-Binding Cassette Transporters
Interstitial Lung Diseases
DNA Sequence Analysis
Surface-Active Agents
Chromosomes
Parents
Phenotype
Lung
DNA
Genes
Proteins

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Agrawal, A., Hamvas, A., Cole, F. S., Wambach, J. A., Wegner, D., Coghill, C., ... Nogee, L. (2012). An intronic ABCA3 mutation that is responsible for respiratory disease. Pediatric Research, 71(6), 633-637. https://doi.org/10.1038/pr.2012.21

An intronic ABCA3 mutation that is responsible for respiratory disease. / Agrawal, Amit; Hamvas, Aaron; Cole, F. Sessions; Wambach, Jennifer A.; Wegner, Daniel; Coghill, Carl; Harrison, Keith; Nogee, Lawrence.

In: Pediatric Research, Vol. 71, No. 6, 06.2012, p. 633-637.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Agrawal, A, Hamvas, A, Cole, FS, Wambach, JA, Wegner, D, Coghill, C, Harrison, K & Nogee, L 2012, 'An intronic ABCA3 mutation that is responsible for respiratory disease', Pediatric Research, vol. 71, no. 6, pp. 633-637. https://doi.org/10.1038/pr.2012.21
Agrawal A, Hamvas A, Cole FS, Wambach JA, Wegner D, Coghill C et al. An intronic ABCA3 mutation that is responsible for respiratory disease. Pediatric Research. 2012 Jun;71(6):633-637. https://doi.org/10.1038/pr.2012.21
Agrawal, Amit ; Hamvas, Aaron ; Cole, F. Sessions ; Wambach, Jennifer A. ; Wegner, Daniel ; Coghill, Carl ; Harrison, Keith ; Nogee, Lawrence. / An intronic ABCA3 mutation that is responsible for respiratory disease. In: Pediatric Research. 2012 ; Vol. 71, No. 6. pp. 633-637.
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