An introductory characterization of a combat-casualty-care relevant swine model of closed head injury resulting from exposure to explosive blast

Richard A. Bauman, Geoffrey Ling, Lawrence Tong, Adolph Januszkiewicz, Denes Agoston, Nihal Delanerolle, Young Kim, Dave Ritzel, Randy Bell, James Ecklund, Rocco Armonda, Faris Bandak, Steven Parks

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Abstract

Explosive blast has been extensively used as a tactical weapon in Operation Iraqi Freedom (OIF) and more recently in Operation Enduring Freedom (OEF). The polytraumatic nature of blast injuries is evidence of their effectiveness, and brain injury is a frequent and debilitating form of this trauma. In-theater clinical observations of brain-injured casualties have shown that edema, intracranial hemorrhage, and vasospasm are the most salient pathophysiological characteristics of blast injury to the brain. Unfortunately, little is known about exactly how an explosion produces these sequelae as well as others that are less well documented. Consequently, the principal objective of the current report is to present a swine model of explosive blast injury to the brain. This model was developed during Phase I of the DARPA (Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency) PREVENT (Preventing Violent Explosive Neurotrauma) blast research program. A second objective is to present data that illustrate the capabilities of this model to study the proximal biomechanical causes and the resulting pathophysiological, biochemical, neuropathological, and neurological consequences of explosive blast injury to the swine brain. In the concluding section of this article, the advantages and limitations of the model are considered, explosive and air-overpressure models are compared, and the physical properties of an explosion are identified that potentially contributed to the in-theater closed head injuries resulting from explosions of improvised explosive devices (IEDs).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)841-860
Number of pages20
JournalJournal of Neurotrauma
Volume26
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2009
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Blast Injuries
Closed Head Injuries
Explosions
Swine
2003-2011 Iraq War
Brain
Afghan Campaign 2001-
Intracranial Vasospasm
Weapons
Intracranial Hemorrhages
Research
Brain Injuries
Edema
Air
Equipment and Supplies
Wounds and Injuries

Keywords

  • Blast tube
  • Brain injury
  • Explosive blast
  • Free field
  • Overpressure
  • Vasospasm

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

An introductory characterization of a combat-casualty-care relevant swine model of closed head injury resulting from exposure to explosive blast. / Bauman, Richard A.; Ling, Geoffrey; Tong, Lawrence; Januszkiewicz, Adolph; Agoston, Denes; Delanerolle, Nihal; Kim, Young; Ritzel, Dave; Bell, Randy; Ecklund, James; Armonda, Rocco; Bandak, Faris; Parks, Steven.

In: Journal of Neurotrauma, Vol. 26, No. 6, 01.06.2009, p. 841-860.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Bauman, RA, Ling, G, Tong, L, Januszkiewicz, A, Agoston, D, Delanerolle, N, Kim, Y, Ritzel, D, Bell, R, Ecklund, J, Armonda, R, Bandak, F & Parks, S 2009, 'An introductory characterization of a combat-casualty-care relevant swine model of closed head injury resulting from exposure to explosive blast', Journal of Neurotrauma, vol. 26, no. 6, pp. 841-860. https://doi.org/10.1089/neu.2008.0898
Bauman, Richard A. ; Ling, Geoffrey ; Tong, Lawrence ; Januszkiewicz, Adolph ; Agoston, Denes ; Delanerolle, Nihal ; Kim, Young ; Ritzel, Dave ; Bell, Randy ; Ecklund, James ; Armonda, Rocco ; Bandak, Faris ; Parks, Steven. / An introductory characterization of a combat-casualty-care relevant swine model of closed head injury resulting from exposure to explosive blast. In: Journal of Neurotrauma. 2009 ; Vol. 26, No. 6. pp. 841-860.
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