An internal water-retention site in the rhomboid intramembrane protease GlpG ensures catalytic efficiency

Yanzi Zhou, Syed M. Moin, Sinisa Urban, Yingkai Zhang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Rhomboid proteases regulate key cellular pathways, but their biochemical mechanism including how water is made available to the membrane-immersed active site remains ambiguous. We performed four prolonged molecular dynamics simulations initiated from both gate-open and gate-closed states of Escherichia coli rhomboid GlpG in a phospholipid bilayer. GlpG was notably stable in both gating states, experiencing similar tilt and local membrane thinning, with no observable gating transitions, highlighting that gating is rate-limiting. Analysis of dynamics revealed rapid loss of crystallographic waters from the active site, but retention of a water cluster within a site formed by His141, Ser181, Ser185, and/or Gln189. Experimental interrogation of 14 engineered mutants revealed an essential role for at least Gln189 and Ser185 in catalysis with no effect on structural stability. Our studies indicate that spontaneous water supply to the intramembrane active site of rhomboid proteases is rare, but its availability for catalysis is ensured by an unanticipated active site element, the water-retention site.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1255-1263
Number of pages9
JournalStructure
Volume20
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 3 2012

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Catalytic Domain
Peptide Hydrolases
Water
Catalysis
Membranes
Water Supply
Molecular Dynamics Simulation
Phospholipids
Escherichia coli

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Molecular Biology
  • Structural Biology

Cite this

An internal water-retention site in the rhomboid intramembrane protease GlpG ensures catalytic efficiency. / Zhou, Yanzi; Moin, Syed M.; Urban, Sinisa; Zhang, Yingkai.

In: Structure, Vol. 20, No. 7, 03.07.2012, p. 1255-1263.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Zhou, Yanzi ; Moin, Syed M. ; Urban, Sinisa ; Zhang, Yingkai. / An internal water-retention site in the rhomboid intramembrane protease GlpG ensures catalytic efficiency. In: Structure. 2012 ; Vol. 20, No. 7. pp. 1255-1263.
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