An integrated mechanobiochemical feedback mechanism describes chromosome motility from prometaphase to anaphase in mitosis

Jian Liu, Arshad Desai, José N. Onuchic, Terence Hwa

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

During mitosis, chromosomes undergo a series of movements while being end-on attached to the kinetochore microtubules (KMTs) from spindle poles. The mechanism underlying such movements and their physiological functions remains elusive. We describe a mechanobiochemical feedback model of chromosome motility. The key ingredient is a feedback mechanism between the local chemical reactions that control the dynamics of KMTs and the mechanical state of the chromosome via tension-sensitive proteins localized at the kinetochores. This model can recapitulate all of the essential and distinct features of chromosome motilities from prometaphase to anaphase in a coherent manner. We further show that this feedback mechanism provides robust and precise means of guiding the chromosome to the cell equator regardless of the initial conditions and uncertainty in velocity. Predictions of our model can be tested experimentally.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)13752-13757
Number of pages6
JournalProceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Volume105
Issue number37
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 16 2008
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Prometaphase
Anaphase
Mitosis
Kinetochores
Chromosomes
Microtubules
Spindle Poles
Uncertainty
Proteins

Keywords

  • Kinetochore microtubule
  • Mitotic spindle checkpoint
  • Tension sensor

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General

Cite this

An integrated mechanobiochemical feedback mechanism describes chromosome motility from prometaphase to anaphase in mitosis. / Liu, Jian; Desai, Arshad; Onuchic, José N.; Hwa, Terence.

In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, Vol. 105, No. 37, 16.09.2008, p. 13752-13757.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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