An institutional commitment to pain management

Betty Ferrell, Grace E. Dean, Marcia Grant, Paul Coluzzi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Purpose: To share the development, implementation, and evaluation of a program called 'An Institutional Commitment to Pain Management,' which is based on the philosophy of organizational influence on pain management. Methods: A tested pain education model was disseminated to 32 physician/nurse teams in settings throughout California, after which the 64 professionals returned to their institutions to serve as role models and catalysts to change the practice of pain management. Each team member completed a 39-item survey about knowledge and attitudes related to pain, which was developed by B.R.F. and colleagues, and also identified three goals for the implementation of course information. Precourse data also included administration of the knowledge and attitudes survey to participating physicians' and nurses' colleagues (10 physicians and 20 nurses per institution). Each team completed five chart audits using the pain audit tool (PAT), which was developed by B.R.F. and colleagues at the City of Hope National Medical Center. The PAT identifies how pain is managed currently at the institutional level. Final course evaluation 8 months after course completion included a summary of activities implemented by the teams as well as the factors that served as barriers and benefits to improve the quality of pain management. Results: Two hundred seventy-two physicians and 629 nurses completed the survey about knowledge and attitudes related to pain, and 154 PATs were submitted. These results, as well as evaluation at the completion of the course, are discussed. Conclusion: The Institutional Commitment to Pain Management program is an evolving model that was developed to overcome barriers to pain relief by obtaining the commitment from institutions to improve the management of pain for their patients.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2158-2165
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Clinical Oncology
Volume13
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1995
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Pain Management
Pain
Nurses
Physicians
Hope
Practice Management
Program Evaluation
Education
Surveys and Questionnaires

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

Cite this

Ferrell, B., Dean, G. E., Grant, M., & Coluzzi, P. (1995). An institutional commitment to pain management. Journal of Clinical Oncology, 13(9), 2158-2165. https://doi.org/10.1200/JCO.1995.13.9.2158

An institutional commitment to pain management. / Ferrell, Betty; Dean, Grace E.; Grant, Marcia; Coluzzi, Paul.

In: Journal of Clinical Oncology, Vol. 13, No. 9, 01.01.1995, p. 2158-2165.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ferrell, B, Dean, GE, Grant, M & Coluzzi, P 1995, 'An institutional commitment to pain management', Journal of Clinical Oncology, vol. 13, no. 9, pp. 2158-2165. https://doi.org/10.1200/JCO.1995.13.9.2158
Ferrell, Betty ; Dean, Grace E. ; Grant, Marcia ; Coluzzi, Paul. / An institutional commitment to pain management. In: Journal of Clinical Oncology. 1995 ; Vol. 13, No. 9. pp. 2158-2165.
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