An in situ, in vivo murine model for the study of laryngotracheal stenosis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

IMPORTANCE: Laryngotracheal stenosis (LTS) lacks an ideal animal model to study its unique wound-healing pathophysiology and the effect of interventions. OBJECTIVE: To present an in vivo, in situ mouse model of LTS that can be used to investigate its pathophysiology, mechanisms, and interventions for treatment. DESIGN, SETTING, AND SUBJECTS: Prospective controlled animal study performed at an academic animal research facility on 87 C57BL/6 mice. INTERVENTIONS: Experimental mice (n = 40) underwent bleomycin-coated wire-brush injury to the larynx and trachea, while mechanical injury controls (n = 32) underwent phosphate-buffered saline-coated wire-brush injury. Normal controls (n = 9) underwent no intervention, and mock surgery controls (n = 6) underwent anterior transcervical tracheal exposure only. Laryngotracheal complexes were harvested at days 7, 14, and 21 after injury. At the respective time points, mice in the chemomechanical and mechanical injury groups were killed, and their laryngotracheal complexes were harvested for histologic analysis. Normal and mock surgery controls were killed and then underwent histologic analysis. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES: The primary outcome measurewas lamina propria thickness. RESULTS: The chemomechanical injury group maintained a significant increase in lamina propria thickness through day 21 compared with uninjured controls at day 7 (82.7 vs 41.8 innodatamum; P

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)961-966
Number of pages6
JournalJAMA Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery
Volume140
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2014

Fingerprint

Pathologic Constriction
Wounds and Injuries
Mucous Membrane
Bleomycin
Larynx
Trachea
Inbred C57BL Mouse
Wound Healing
Animal Models
Phosphates

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Otorhinolaryngology
  • Surgery
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

@article{9f5a65b37f784b059ab236b0a371498a,
title = "An in situ, in vivo murine model for the study of laryngotracheal stenosis",
abstract = "IMPORTANCE: Laryngotracheal stenosis (LTS) lacks an ideal animal model to study its unique wound-healing pathophysiology and the effect of interventions. OBJECTIVE: To present an in vivo, in situ mouse model of LTS that can be used to investigate its pathophysiology, mechanisms, and interventions for treatment. DESIGN, SETTING, AND SUBJECTS: Prospective controlled animal study performed at an academic animal research facility on 87 C57BL/6 mice. INTERVENTIONS: Experimental mice (n = 40) underwent bleomycin-coated wire-brush injury to the larynx and trachea, while mechanical injury controls (n = 32) underwent phosphate-buffered saline-coated wire-brush injury. Normal controls (n = 9) underwent no intervention, and mock surgery controls (n = 6) underwent anterior transcervical tracheal exposure only. Laryngotracheal complexes were harvested at days 7, 14, and 21 after injury. At the respective time points, mice in the chemomechanical and mechanical injury groups were killed, and their laryngotracheal complexes were harvested for histologic analysis. Normal and mock surgery controls were killed and then underwent histologic analysis. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES: The primary outcome measurewas lamina propria thickness. RESULTS: The chemomechanical injury group maintained a significant increase in lamina propria thickness through day 21 compared with uninjured controls at day 7 (82.7 vs 41.8 innodatamum; P",
author = "Hillel, {Alexander Tell} and Daryan Namba and Dacheng Ding and Vinciya Pandian and Elisseeff, {Jennifer Hartt} and Maureen Horton",
year = "2014",
month = "10",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1001/jamaoto.2014.1663",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "140",
pages = "961--966",
journal = "Archives of Otolaryngology",
issn = "2168-6181",
publisher = "American Medical Association",
number = "10",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - An in situ, in vivo murine model for the study of laryngotracheal stenosis

AU - Hillel, Alexander Tell

AU - Namba, Daryan

AU - Ding, Dacheng

AU - Pandian, Vinciya

AU - Elisseeff, Jennifer Hartt

AU - Horton, Maureen

PY - 2014/10/1

Y1 - 2014/10/1

N2 - IMPORTANCE: Laryngotracheal stenosis (LTS) lacks an ideal animal model to study its unique wound-healing pathophysiology and the effect of interventions. OBJECTIVE: To present an in vivo, in situ mouse model of LTS that can be used to investigate its pathophysiology, mechanisms, and interventions for treatment. DESIGN, SETTING, AND SUBJECTS: Prospective controlled animal study performed at an academic animal research facility on 87 C57BL/6 mice. INTERVENTIONS: Experimental mice (n = 40) underwent bleomycin-coated wire-brush injury to the larynx and trachea, while mechanical injury controls (n = 32) underwent phosphate-buffered saline-coated wire-brush injury. Normal controls (n = 9) underwent no intervention, and mock surgery controls (n = 6) underwent anterior transcervical tracheal exposure only. Laryngotracheal complexes were harvested at days 7, 14, and 21 after injury. At the respective time points, mice in the chemomechanical and mechanical injury groups were killed, and their laryngotracheal complexes were harvested for histologic analysis. Normal and mock surgery controls were killed and then underwent histologic analysis. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES: The primary outcome measurewas lamina propria thickness. RESULTS: The chemomechanical injury group maintained a significant increase in lamina propria thickness through day 21 compared with uninjured controls at day 7 (82.7 vs 41.8 innodatamum; P

AB - IMPORTANCE: Laryngotracheal stenosis (LTS) lacks an ideal animal model to study its unique wound-healing pathophysiology and the effect of interventions. OBJECTIVE: To present an in vivo, in situ mouse model of LTS that can be used to investigate its pathophysiology, mechanisms, and interventions for treatment. DESIGN, SETTING, AND SUBJECTS: Prospective controlled animal study performed at an academic animal research facility on 87 C57BL/6 mice. INTERVENTIONS: Experimental mice (n = 40) underwent bleomycin-coated wire-brush injury to the larynx and trachea, while mechanical injury controls (n = 32) underwent phosphate-buffered saline-coated wire-brush injury. Normal controls (n = 9) underwent no intervention, and mock surgery controls (n = 6) underwent anterior transcervical tracheal exposure only. Laryngotracheal complexes were harvested at days 7, 14, and 21 after injury. At the respective time points, mice in the chemomechanical and mechanical injury groups were killed, and their laryngotracheal complexes were harvested for histologic analysis. Normal and mock surgery controls were killed and then underwent histologic analysis. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES: The primary outcome measurewas lamina propria thickness. RESULTS: The chemomechanical injury group maintained a significant increase in lamina propria thickness through day 21 compared with uninjured controls at day 7 (82.7 vs 41.8 innodatamum; P

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84908679435&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84908679435&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1001/jamaoto.2014.1663

DO - 10.1001/jamaoto.2014.1663

M3 - Article

C2 - 25144860

AN - SCOPUS:84908679435

VL - 140

SP - 961

EP - 966

JO - Archives of Otolaryngology

JF - Archives of Otolaryngology

SN - 2168-6181

IS - 10

ER -