An improved method for recording blood pressure in the tethered monkey

M. I. Talan, B. T. Engel

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Existing tethering systems intended for continuous recording of blood pressure incur two major problems: 1) vertical movements of the animal in the cage produce a significant error in measured pressure introduced by the change in distance between the pressure transducer and the highest point of the infusion system and 2) the necessity for repeated zero adjustment of the pressure transducer requires sedation of the animal and disconnection of the catheter. Continuous infusion and a one-way valve in the infusion line in proximity to the pressure transducer will eliminate the error of measurement related to vertical movement of the animal. A remotely controlled, two-way solenoid valve can close the catheter line and open the pressure transducer to atmospheric pressure, thereby permitting repeated zero adjustment without sedation of the animal and disconnection of the catheter. Eliminating the need to disconnect the catheter will significantly reduce the risk of adventitious infection.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)R1512-R1515
JournalAmerican Journal of Physiology - Regulatory Integrative and Comparative Physiology
Volume258
Issue number6 27-6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1990

Keywords

  • chronic recording
  • tether

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Physiology (medical)

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