An experimental in-vivo canine model for adult shunt infection

Roger Bayston, Christine Brant, Stephen M. Dombrowski, Geraldine Hall, Marion Tuohy, Gary Procop, Mark Luciano

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Detailed human studies of the mechanisms and development of shunt infection in real time are not possible, and we have developed a canine hydrocephalus model to overcome this. The intention of this pilot study was to show that the canine hydrocephalus model could be shunted using conventional "human" shunts, and that a shunt infection could be established so that further studies could then be planned. Methods: Hydrocephalus was induced in seven dogs (Canis familiaris) by fourth ventricle obstruction. Four weeks later they were shunted using a Hakim Precision valve. Four of the dogs received shunts whose ventricular catheter had been inoculated with Staphylococcus epidermidis, and three were uninoculated controls. Four weeks after shunting the dogs were sacrificed and necropsy was performed. Removed shunts and tissue samples were examined microbiologically and isolates were subjected to detailed identification and genomic comparison. Results: All the dogs remained well after shunting. Examination of removed shunt components revealed S. epidermidis in the brain and throughout the shunt system in the four inoculated animals, but in two of these Staphylococcus intermedius was also found. S. intermedius was also isolated from all three "negative" controls. There were slight differences between S. intermedius strains suggesting endogenous infection rather than cross- infection from a point source. Conclusion: Shunt infection was established in the canine model, and had the experiment been extended beyond four weeks the typical microbiological, pathological and clinical features might have appeared. The occurrence of unplanned shunt infections in control animals due to canine normal skin flora reflects human clinical experience and underlines the usual source of bacteria causing shunt infection.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number17
JournalCerebrospinal Fluid Research
Volume5
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 24 2008
Externally publishedYes

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Staphylococcus intermedius
Canidae
Dogs
Hydrocephalus
Infection
Staphylococcus epidermidis
Fourth Ventricle
Infection Control
Cross Infection
Catheters
Bacteria
Skin
Brain

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience
  • Neurology
  • Developmental Neuroscience

Cite this

Bayston, R., Brant, C., Dombrowski, S. M., Hall, G., Tuohy, M., Procop, G., & Luciano, M. (2008). An experimental in-vivo canine model for adult shunt infection. Cerebrospinal Fluid Research, 5, [17]. https://doi.org/10.1186/1743-8454-5-17

An experimental in-vivo canine model for adult shunt infection. / Bayston, Roger; Brant, Christine; Dombrowski, Stephen M.; Hall, Geraldine; Tuohy, Marion; Procop, Gary; Luciano, Mark.

In: Cerebrospinal Fluid Research, Vol. 5, 17, 24.10.2008.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Bayston R, Brant C, Dombrowski SM, Hall G, Tuohy M, Procop G et al. An experimental in-vivo canine model for adult shunt infection. Cerebrospinal Fluid Research. 2008 Oct 24;5. 17. https://doi.org/10.1186/1743-8454-5-17
Bayston, Roger ; Brant, Christine ; Dombrowski, Stephen M. ; Hall, Geraldine ; Tuohy, Marion ; Procop, Gary ; Luciano, Mark. / An experimental in-vivo canine model for adult shunt infection. In: Cerebrospinal Fluid Research. 2008 ; Vol. 5.
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