An Examination of Historical Loss Thinking Frequency and Rumination on Suicide Ideation in American Indian Young Adults

Raymond P. Tucker, La Ricka R. Wingate, Victoria M. O'Keefe, David W. Hollingsworth, Ashley B. Cole

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

No research has empirically investigated whether frequency of historical loss thinking is a potential risk factor for suicide ideation in American Indians. Results of this study demonstrated that the frequency of historical loss thinking was positively associated with brooding and reflection at a small magnitude, but was not directly related to suicide ideation. Bootstrapping analyses indicated small indirect effects of historical loss thinking frequency on suicide ideation through brooding and reflection individually, but only through brooding when analyzed in a parallel mediation model. These findings suggest that American Indians who more frequently engage in historical loss thinking may be susceptible to suicide ideation via an increase in ruminative tendencies, specifically brooding.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)213-222
Number of pages10
JournalSuicide and Life-Threatening Behavior
Volume46
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2016
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Psychology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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