An ex vivo biomechanical evaluation of a hydroxyapatite cement for use with kyphoplasty

Stephen M Belkoff, J. M. Mathis, H. Deramond, L. E. Jasper

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Previous ex vivo biomechanical studies have shown that kyphoplasty with polymethylmethacrylate cement increases vertebral body (VB) strength and restores VB stiffness and height after compression fracture. The purpose of the current study was to determine if a hydroxyapatite cement used as a void filler during kyphoplasty provides mechanical stabilization similar to that of a polymethylmethacrylate cement. METHODS: Simulated compression fractures were experimentally created in 33 osteoporotic VBs harvested from female cadaver spines. VBs were assigned to one of three groups: 1) kyphoplasty with a custom mixture of Simplex P; 2) kyphoplasty with BoneSource; and 3) no treatment. The kyphoplasty treatment consisted of inserting a balloon-like device into the VB via both pedicles, inflating the tamp, and filling the created void with Simplex P bone cement or BoneSource. VBs in the no-treatment group received no interventions. Pre- and posttreatment heights were measured, and the repaired VBs were recompressed to determine posttreatment strength and stiffness values. RESULTS: Kyphoplasty with altered Simplex P restored strength, whereas kyphoplasty with BoneSource and the no-treatment protocol both resulted in significantly weaker VBs relative to initial strength. All treatments resulted in significantly less stiff VBs relative to their initial condition. All VBs lost significant height after initial compression, but a significant amount of lost height was restored by kyphoplasty with either cement. CONCLUSION: Kyphoplasty with either cement significantly restored VB height. Kyphoplasty with altered Simplex P resulted in stronger repairs than did no treatment or kyphoplasty with BoneSource.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1212-1216
Number of pages5
JournalAmerican Journal of Neuroradiology
Volume22
Issue number6
StatePublished - 2001

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Kyphoplasty
Methylmethacrylate
Compression Fractures
Body Height
Polymethyl Methacrylate
hydroxyapatite cement
Therapeutics
Bone Cements
Clinical Protocols
Cadaver
Spine

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Radiological and Ultrasound Technology

Cite this

Belkoff, S. M., Mathis, J. M., Deramond, H., & Jasper, L. E. (2001). An ex vivo biomechanical evaluation of a hydroxyapatite cement for use with kyphoplasty. American Journal of Neuroradiology, 22(6), 1212-1216.

An ex vivo biomechanical evaluation of a hydroxyapatite cement for use with kyphoplasty. / Belkoff, Stephen M; Mathis, J. M.; Deramond, H.; Jasper, L. E.

In: American Journal of Neuroradiology, Vol. 22, No. 6, 2001, p. 1212-1216.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Belkoff, SM, Mathis, JM, Deramond, H & Jasper, LE 2001, 'An ex vivo biomechanical evaluation of a hydroxyapatite cement for use with kyphoplasty', American Journal of Neuroradiology, vol. 22, no. 6, pp. 1212-1216.
Belkoff, Stephen M ; Mathis, J. M. ; Deramond, H. ; Jasper, L. E. / An ex vivo biomechanical evaluation of a hydroxyapatite cement for use with kyphoplasty. In: American Journal of Neuroradiology. 2001 ; Vol. 22, No. 6. pp. 1212-1216.
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