An evidence-based comparison of operational criteria for the presence of sarcopenia

Thuy Tien Dam, Katherine W. Peters, Maren Fragala, Peggy M. Cawthon, Tamara B. Harris, Robert McLean, Michelle Shardell, Dawn E. Alley, Anne Kenny, Luigi Ferrucci, Jack Guralnik, Douglas P. Kiel, Steve Kritchevsky, Maria T. Vassileva, Stephanie Studenski

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background.Several consensus groups have previously published operational criteria for sarcopenia, incorporating lean mass with strength and/or physical performance. The purpose of this manuscript is to describe the prevalence, agreement, and discrepancies between the Foundation for the National Institutes of Health (FNIH) criteria with other operational definitions for sarcopenia.Methods.The FNIH Sarcopenia Project used data from nine studies including: Age, Gene and Environment Susceptibility-Reykjavik Study; Boston Puerto Rican Health Study; a series of six clinical trials from the University of Connecticut; Framingham Heart Study; Health, Aging, and Body Composition Study; Invecchiare in Chianti; Osteoporotic Fractures in Men Study; Rancho Bernardo Study; and Study of Osteoporotic Fractures. Participants included in these analyses were aged 65 and older and had measures of body mass index, appendicular lean mass, grip strength, and gait speed.Results.The prevalence of sarcopenia and agreement proportions was higher in women than men. The lowest prevalence was observed with the FNIH criteria (1.3% men and 2.3% women) compared with the International Working Group and the European Working Group for Sarcopenia in Older Persons (5.1% and 5.3% in men and 11.8% and 13.3% in women, respectively). The positive percent agreements between the FNIH criteria and other criteria were low, ranging from 7% to 32% in men and 5% to 19% in women. However, the negative percent agreement were high (all >95%).Conclusions.The FNIH criteria result in a more conservative operational definition of sarcopenia, and the prevalence was lower compared with other proposed criteria. Agreement for diagnosing sarcopenia was low, but agreement for ruling out sarcopenia was very high. Consensus on the operational criteria for the diagnosis of sarcopenia is much needed to characterize populations for study and to identify adults for treatment.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)584-590
Number of pages7
JournalJournals of Gerontology - Series A Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences
Volume69 A
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - 2014
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Lean mass.
  • Muscle
  • Sarcopenia

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Aging
  • Geriatrics and Gerontology
  • Medicine(all)

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