An epidemiological and molecular study of the relationship between smoking, risk of nasopharyngeal carcinoma, and epsteinbarr virus activation

Feng Hua Xu, Dan Xiong, Ya Fei Xu, Su Mei Cao, Wen Qiong Xue, Hai De Qin, Wen Sheng Liu, Jing Yan Cao, Ying Zhang, Qi Sheng Feng, Li Zhen Chen, Man Zhi Li, Zhi Wei Liu, Qing Liu, Ming Huang Hong, Yin Yao Shugart, Yi Xin Zeng, Mu Sheng Zeng, Wei Hua Jia

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background Elevated levels of antibodies against antigens in the EpsteinBarr virus (EBV) lytic phase are important predictive markers for nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) risk. Several lifestyle factors, including smoking, have also been associated with NPC risk. We hypothesized that some specific lifestyle factors induce transformation of EBV from the latent to the lytic stage and contribute to NPC occurrence.MethodsWe conducted a casecontrol study using data from male case patients (n = 1316) and control subjects (n = 1571) living in Guangdong Province, an area in China at high risk for NPC, to study potential NPC risk factors and EBV inducers. Two independent healthy male populations from a second high-risk area (n = 1657) and a low-risk area (n = 1961) were also included in the analysis of potential EBV inducers using logistic regression models. In vitro assays were performed to investigate the effect of cigarette smoke extract on EBV activation in two EBV-positive cell lines. All statistical tests were two-sided.ResultsSmoking was associated with an increased risk of NPC among the Guangdong participants with 2040 and 40 or more pack-years vs never smokers (OR = 1.52, 95% CI = 1.22 to 1.88 and OR = 1.76, 95% CI = 1.34 to 2.32, respectively; Ptrend

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1396-1410
Number of pages15
JournalJournal of the National Cancer Institute
Volume104
Issue number18
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 19 2012
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cancer Research
  • Oncology

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