An assessment of the relationship between condom labels and HIV-related beliefs and intentions

Amy Bleakley, Martin Fishbein, David Holtgrave

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The aim of this article is to examine the impact of the FDA's proposed condom package labeling on HIV-related beliefs about condom effectiveness, on intentions to recommend condoms for friends to use, and intentions to use condoms. Using a nationally representative survey we randomized 1,194 adults ages 18-65 years into one of three condom label conditions: the current label on condom packaging; a label with the proposed FDA language; and a label with CDC language on condom effectiveness. In short, there are no significant differences between the proposed FDA label and the current label on HIV-related beliefs and intentions. In contrast, from an HIV prevention perspective, the CDC condom language appears to offer a better alternative to the current condom label for unmarried populations.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)452-458
Number of pages7
JournalAIDS and behavior
Volume12
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2008

Keywords

  • Condom labels
  • FDA warning labels
  • HIV prevention

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Infectious Diseases

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