An area essential for linking word meanings to word forms: Evidence from primary progressive aphasia

D. S. Race, K. Tsapkini, J. Crinion, M. Newhart, C. Davis, Y. Gomez, A. E. Hillis, A. V. Faria

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

We investigated the relationship between deficits in naming and areas of focal atrophy in primary progressive aphasia (a neurodegenerative disease that specifically affects language processing). We tested patients, across multiple input modalities, on traditional naming tasks (picture naming) and more complex tasks (sentence completion with a name, naming in response to a question) and obtained high resolution MRI. Across most tasks, error rates were correlated with atrophy in the left middle and posterior inferior temporal gyrus. Overall, this result converges with prior literature suggesting that this region plays a major role in modality independent lexical processing.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)167-176
Number of pages10
JournalBrain and Language
Volume127
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2013

Keywords

  • Inferior temporal cortex
  • Lexical access
  • MRI
  • Naming
  • Neurodegeneration
  • Primary progressive aphasia

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Language and Linguistics
  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Linguistics and Language
  • Cognitive Neuroscience
  • Speech and Hearing

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