Amniocentesis in mothers who are hepatitis B virus carriers does not expose the infant to an increased risk of hepatitis B virus infection

T. M. Ko, L. H. Tseng, M. H. Chang, D. S. Chen, F. J. Hsieh, S. M. Chuang, T. Y. Lee

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Sixty-seven pairs of mothers with hepatitis B virus (HBV) surface antigen (HBsAg) and their infants were divided into two study groups to determine the effect of amniocentesis on intrauterine HBV infection. In the first study group (35 pairs), the infant's HBsAg status in cord blood was studied and the results were compared with those obtained in the cord blood from 65 infants born to HBsAg-positive women who did not have an amniocentesis. In the second study group (32 pairs), the HBV status of the infants was studied at the age of three months to five years and compared with the HBV status of 3,454 infants in the National HBV Prevention Program. In the first study group, one sample (2.9%) was weakly positive for HBsAg; while in the first control group, two (3.1%) were positive. In the second study group, three (10%) infants were positive for HBsAg. The failure rates of immunoprophylaxis in the second study and control groups were similar (9.4% vs 11% for HBsAg carrier mothers; 30% vs 14% for HBe antigen-positive carrier mothers). This suggested that genetic amniocentesis did not increase the risk of intrauterine HBV infection.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)25-30
Number of pages6
JournalArchives of Gynecology and Obstetrics
Volume255
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1994
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Amniocentesis
Virus Diseases
Hepatitis B virus
Surface Antigens
Mothers
Fetal Blood
Control Groups
Hepatitis B Surface Antigens
Antigens

Keywords

  • Genetic amniocentesis
  • Hepatitis B virus
  • Intrauterine infection

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

Cite this

Amniocentesis in mothers who are hepatitis B virus carriers does not expose the infant to an increased risk of hepatitis B virus infection. / Ko, T. M.; Tseng, L. H.; Chang, M. H.; Chen, D. S.; Hsieh, F. J.; Chuang, S. M.; Lee, T. Y.

In: Archives of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Vol. 255, No. 1, 03.1994, p. 25-30.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ko, T. M. ; Tseng, L. H. ; Chang, M. H. ; Chen, D. S. ; Hsieh, F. J. ; Chuang, S. M. ; Lee, T. Y. / Amniocentesis in mothers who are hepatitis B virus carriers does not expose the infant to an increased risk of hepatitis B virus infection. In: Archives of Gynecology and Obstetrics. 1994 ; Vol. 255, No. 1. pp. 25-30.
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