Ameliorating Effects and Autonomic Mechanisms of Transcutaneous Electrical Acustimulation in Patients With Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease

Yedong Hu, Bo Zhang, Xiaodan Shi, Beifang Ning, Jian Shi, Xin Zeng, Fei Liu, Jiande D.Z. Chen, Wei Fen Xie

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background/Aim: Gastric dysmotility is one of pathophysiologies of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of transcutaneous electrical acustimulation (TEA) on gastric accommodation and gastric slow waves, and evaluate possible mechanisms in patients with GERD. Methods: Thirty patients were studied in two randomized sessions of sham-TEA and TEA with the measurements of esophageal high-resolution manometry (HRM), gastric accommodation assessed by a nutrient-drinking test, electrogastrogram (EGG), electrocardiogram (ECG), and postprandial dyspeptic symptoms. Results: Compared with sham-TEA, TEA improved nutrient drinking-induced fullness (42.0 ± 3.3 vs. 31.0 ± 3.5, P = 0.003) at 10 min after the drink, and belching right after the drink (22.0 ± 4.6 vs. 11.7 ± 3.1, P = 0.012) and at 10 min (16.0 ± 3.8 vs. 3.0 ± 1.5, P = 0.002) after the drink. TEA also improved gastric accommodation (954 ± 37 mL vs. 857 ± 47 mL, P = 0.001) and normalized maximal drink-induced impairment in gastric slow waves. Concurrently, TEA enhanced vagal activity assessed from spectral analysis of heart rate variability in the postprandial state (0.42 ± 0.03 vs. 0.49 ± 0.04, P = 0.039). The vagal activity was positively correlated with the percentage of normal slow waves (r = 0.528; P = 0.003) and negatively correlated with the regurgitation score (r = −0.408, P = 0.025). Conclusions: Acute TEA increases gastric accommodation, improves gastric slow waves, and reduces postprandial fullness and belching, possibly mediated via the vagal mechanisms.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1207-1214
Number of pages8
JournalNeuromodulation
Volume23
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2020

Keywords

  • Autonomic functions
  • esophageal motility
  • gastric accommodation
  • gastric slow waves
  • gastroesophageal reflux disease

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neurology
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Ameliorating Effects and Autonomic Mechanisms of Transcutaneous Electrical Acustimulation in Patients With Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this