Ambulatory specialist use by nonhospitalized patients in us health plans: Correlates and consequences

Barbara Starfield, Hsien Yen Chang, Klaus W. Lemke, Jonathan P. Weiner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Approximately 7 of 10 (and 95% of the elderly) people in US health plans see one or more specialists in a year. Controlling for extent of morbidity, discontinuity of primary care physician visits is associated with seeing more different specialists. Having a general internist as the primary care physician is associated with more different specialists seen. Controlling for differences in the degree of morbidity, receiving care from multiple specialists is associated with higher costs, more procedures, and more medications, independent of the number of visits and age of the patient.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)216-225
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Ambulatory Care Management
Volume32
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2009

Keywords

  • Continuity of care
  • Costs of care
  • Family physicians
  • General internists
  • Primary Care
  • Resource use
  • Specialist care

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health Policy

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