Ambulatory blood pressure patterns in children with chronic kidney disease

Joshua Samuels, Derek Ng, Joseph T. Flynn, Mark Mitsnefes, Tim Poffenbarger, Bradley A. Warady, Susan Furth

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Ambulatory blood pressure (BP) monitoring (ABPM) is the best method of detecting abnormal BP in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD), whose hypertension may be missed with casual BP measurements. We report ABPM findings in 332 children 1 year after entry in the Chronic Kidney Disease in Children cohort study. All of the subjects underwent casual and ambulatory BP measurement. BP was categorized based on casual and ABPM results into normal (42%), white-coat (4%), masked (35%), and ambulatory (14%) hypertension. Only half of the subjects had a normal ABPM. BP load was elevated (>25%) in 52% (n=172), whereas mean BP was elevated in 32% (n=105). In multivariate analysis, those using an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor were 89% more likely to have a normal ABPM than those who did not report using an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor (odds ratio, 1.89 [95% CI, 1.17-3.04]). For every 20% faster decline in annualized glomerular filtration rate change, the odds of an abnormal ABPM increased 26% (odds ratio, 1.26 [95% CI, 0.97-1.64]). A 2.25-fold increase in urine protein:creatinine ratio annualized change was associated with a 39% higher odds of an abnormal ABPM (odds ratio, 1.39 [95% CI, 1.06-1.82]). Abnormalities on ABPM are common in children with chronic kidney disease and are strongly associated with known risk factors for end-stage renal disease. Individuals on angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors were less likely to have abnormal ABPM, suggesting a possible therapeutic intervention. ABPM should be used to monitor risk and guide therapy in children with chronic kidney disease.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)43-50
Number of pages8
JournalHypertension
Volume60
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2012

Keywords

  • Ambulatory blood pressure
  • Blood pressure measurement/monitoring
  • Chronic kidney disease
  • Epidemiology
  • Pediatric
  • Proteinuria

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Internal Medicine

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  • Cite this

    Samuels, J., Ng, D., Flynn, J. T., Mitsnefes, M., Poffenbarger, T., Warady, B. A., & Furth, S. (2012). Ambulatory blood pressure patterns in children with chronic kidney disease. Hypertension, 60(1), 43-50. https://doi.org/10.1161/HYPERTENSIONAHA.111.189266