Alzheimer's disease biomarkers as predictors of trajectories of depression and apathy in cognitively normal individuals, mild cognitive impairment, and Alzheimer's disease dementia

Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objectives: To examine trajectories of depression and apathy over a 5-year follow-up period in (prodromal) Alzheimer's disease (AD), and to relate these trajectories to AD biomarkers. Methods: The trajectories of depression and apathy (measured with the Neuropsychiatric Inventory or its questionnaire) were separately modeled using growth mixture models for two cohorts (National Alzheimer's Coordinating Center, NACC, n = 22 760 and Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative, ADNI, n = 1 733). The trajectories in ADNI were associated with baseline CSF AD biomarkers (Aβ42, t-tau, and p-tau) using bias-corrected multinomial logistic regression. Results: Multiple classes were identified, with the largest classes having no symptoms over time. Lower Aβ42 and higher tau (ie, more AD pathology) was associated with increased probability of depression and apathy over time, compared to classes without symptoms. Lower Aβ42 (but not tau) was associated with a steep increase of apathy, whereas higher tau (but not Aβ42) was associated with a steep decrease of apathy. Discussion: The trajectories of depression and apathy in individuals on the AD spectrum are associated with AD biomarkers.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)224-234
Number of pages11
JournalInternational journal of geriatric psychiatry
Volume36
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2021

Keywords

  • Alzheimer's disease
  • apathy
  • cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers
  • depression
  • mild cognitive impairment
  • neurocognitive disorders

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geriatrics and Gerontology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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