Alterations in the levels of heterotrimeric G protein subunits induced by psychostimulants, opiates, barbiturates, and ethanol: Implications for drug dependence, tolerance, and withdrawal

Nobue Kitanaka, Junichi Kitanaka, F. Scott Hall, Tomohiro Tatsuta, Yoshio Morita, Motohiko Takemura, Xiao Bing Wang, George R. Uhl

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Neuronal adaptations have been found to occur in multiple brain regions after chronic intake of abused drugs, and are therefore thought to underlie drug dependence, tolerance, and withdrawal. Pathophysiological changes in drug responsiveness as well as behavioral sequelae of chronic drug exposure are thought to depend largely upon the altered state of heterotrimeric GTP binding protein (G protein)-coupled receptor (GPCR)-G protein interactions. Responsiveness of GPCR-related intracellular signaling systems to drugs of abuse is heterogeneous, depending on the types of intracellular effectors to which the specific Gα protein subtypes are coupled and GPCR-G protein coupling efficiency, factors influenced by the class of drug, expression levels of G protein subunits, and drug treatment regimens. To enhance understanding of the molecular mechanisms that underlie the development of pathophysiological states resulting from chronic intake of abused drugs, this review focuses on alterations in the expression levels of G protein subunits induced by various drugs of abuse. Changes in these mechanisms appear to be specific to particular drugs of abuse, and specific conditions of drug treatment.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)689-699
Number of pages11
JournalSynapse
Volume62
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2008
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Opiate Alkaloids
Drug Tolerance
Heterotrimeric GTP-Binding Proteins
Barbiturates
Protein Subunits
Substance-Related Disorders
Ethanol
GTP-Binding Proteins
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Street Drugs
G-Protein-Coupled Receptors

Keywords

  • Amphetamine
  • Cocaine
  • Gene and protein expression
  • Intracellular effector
  • Morphine
  • Transcription factor

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Physiology
  • Pharmacology
  • Advanced and Specialized Nursing

Cite this

Alterations in the levels of heterotrimeric G protein subunits induced by psychostimulants, opiates, barbiturates, and ethanol : Implications for drug dependence, tolerance, and withdrawal. / Kitanaka, Nobue; Kitanaka, Junichi; Hall, F. Scott; Tatsuta, Tomohiro; Morita, Yoshio; Takemura, Motohiko; Wang, Xiao Bing; Uhl, George R.

In: Synapse, Vol. 62, No. 9, 09.2008, p. 689-699.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kitanaka, Nobue ; Kitanaka, Junichi ; Hall, F. Scott ; Tatsuta, Tomohiro ; Morita, Yoshio ; Takemura, Motohiko ; Wang, Xiao Bing ; Uhl, George R. / Alterations in the levels of heterotrimeric G protein subunits induced by psychostimulants, opiates, barbiturates, and ethanol : Implications for drug dependence, tolerance, and withdrawal. In: Synapse. 2008 ; Vol. 62, No. 9. pp. 689-699.
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