Alterations in Alzheimer's Disease—Associated Protein in Alzheimer's Disease Frontal and Temporal Cortex

Garth Bissette, Wayne H. Smith, Kenneth C. Dole, Barbara Crain, Hossein Ghanbari, Barney Miller, Charles B. Nemeroff

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Alzheimer's disease (AD)—associated protein is present in brain and cerebrospinal fluid of patients with AD but not in adult, nondemented, normal controls. This protein may represent an abnormal epitope of the “tau” microtubuleassociated protein and has been detected before the appearance of senile plaques and neurofibrillary tangles. The amount of AD—associated protein in the frontal and temporal cortices in 93 cases of neuropathologically confirmed AD was compared with the amount that was present in 20 cases without AD. The amount of AD—associated protein was significantly increased in the cases of AD for both brain regions compared with that in the cases without AD. The presence of high levels of this protein is a useful adjunct, postmortem marker of the presence of AD and may eventually lead to tests that allow early detection of individuals at risk for this disease.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1009-1012
Number of pages4
JournalArchives of General Psychiatry
Volume48
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - 1991
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Frontal Lobe
Temporal Lobe
Alzheimer Disease
Proteins
tau Proteins
Neurofibrillary Tangles
Amyloid Plaques
Brain
Protein
Alteration
Alzheimer
Alzheimer's Disease
Cortex
Cerebrospinal Fluid
Epitopes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Bissette, G., Smith, W. H., Dole, K. C., Crain, B., Ghanbari, H., Miller, B., & Nemeroff, C. B. (1991). Alterations in Alzheimer's Disease—Associated Protein in Alzheimer's Disease Frontal and Temporal Cortex. Archives of General Psychiatry, 48(11), 1009-1012. https://doi.org/10.1001/archpsyc.1991.01810350049007

Alterations in Alzheimer's Disease—Associated Protein in Alzheimer's Disease Frontal and Temporal Cortex. / Bissette, Garth; Smith, Wayne H.; Dole, Kenneth C.; Crain, Barbara; Ghanbari, Hossein; Miller, Barney; Nemeroff, Charles B.

In: Archives of General Psychiatry, Vol. 48, No. 11, 1991, p. 1009-1012.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Bissette, G, Smith, WH, Dole, KC, Crain, B, Ghanbari, H, Miller, B & Nemeroff, CB 1991, 'Alterations in Alzheimer's Disease—Associated Protein in Alzheimer's Disease Frontal and Temporal Cortex', Archives of General Psychiatry, vol. 48, no. 11, pp. 1009-1012. https://doi.org/10.1001/archpsyc.1991.01810350049007
Bissette, Garth ; Smith, Wayne H. ; Dole, Kenneth C. ; Crain, Barbara ; Ghanbari, Hossein ; Miller, Barney ; Nemeroff, Charles B. / Alterations in Alzheimer's Disease—Associated Protein in Alzheimer's Disease Frontal and Temporal Cortex. In: Archives of General Psychiatry. 1991 ; Vol. 48, No. 11. pp. 1009-1012.
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