Alcohol use by pedestrians who are struck by motor vehicles

How drinking influences behaviors, medical management, and outcomes

Linda A. Dultz, Spiros Frangos, George Foltin, Mollie Marr, Ronald Simon, Omar Bholat, Deborah A. Levine, Dekeya Slaughter-Larkem, Sally Jacko, Patricia Ayoung-Chee, H. Leon Pachter

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Injuries to pedestrians struck by motor vehicles represent a significant public health hazard in large cities. The purpose of this study is to investigate the demographics of alcohol users who are struck by motor vehicles and to assess the effects of alcohol on pedestrian crossing patterns, medical management, and outcomes. Methods: Data were prospectively collected between December 2008 to September 2010 on all pedestrians who presented to a Level I trauma center after being struck by a motor vehicle. Variables were obtained by interviewing patients, scene witnesses, first responders, and medical records. Results: Pedestrians who used alcohol were less likely to cross the street in the crosswalk with the signal (22.6% vs. 64.7%) and more likely to cross either in the crosswalk against the signal (22.6% vs. 12.4%) or midblock (54.8% vs. 22.8%). Alcohol use was associated with more initial computed tomography imaging studies compared with no alcohol involvement. Alcohol use was associated with a higher Injury Severity Score (8.82 vs. 4.85; p < 0.001) and hospital length of stay (3.89 days vs. 1.82 days; p < 0.001) compared with those with no alcohol involvement. Patients who used alcohol had a lower average Glasgow Coma Scale score (13.80 vs. 14.76; p < 0.001) and a higher rate of head and neck, face, chest, abdomen, and extremity/pelvic girdle injuries (based on Abbreviated Injury Scale) than those with no alcohol involvement. Conclusion: Alcohol use is a significant risk factor for pedestrians who are struck by motor vehicles. These patients are more likely to cross the street in an unsafe manner and sustain more serious injuries. Traffic safety and injury prevention programs must address irresponsible alcohol use by pedestrians.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1252-1257
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Trauma - Injury, Infection and Critical Care
Volume71
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2011
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Drinking Behavior
Motor Vehicles
Alcohols
Wounds and Injuries
Length of Stay
Pedestrians
Abbreviated Injury Scale
Glasgow Coma Scale
Injury Severity Score
Trauma Centers
Abdomen
Medical Records
Neck
Thorax
Extremities
Public Health
Head
Tomography
Demography

Keywords

  • Alcohol
  • Motor vehicle collisions
  • Pedestrian

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Critical Care and Intensive Care Medicine

Cite this

Alcohol use by pedestrians who are struck by motor vehicles : How drinking influences behaviors, medical management, and outcomes. / Dultz, Linda A.; Frangos, Spiros; Foltin, George; Marr, Mollie; Simon, Ronald; Bholat, Omar; Levine, Deborah A.; Slaughter-Larkem, Dekeya; Jacko, Sally; Ayoung-Chee, Patricia; Pachter, H. Leon.

In: Journal of Trauma - Injury, Infection and Critical Care, Vol. 71, No. 5, 11.2011, p. 1252-1257.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Dultz, LA, Frangos, S, Foltin, G, Marr, M, Simon, R, Bholat, O, Levine, DA, Slaughter-Larkem, D, Jacko, S, Ayoung-Chee, P & Pachter, HL 2011, 'Alcohol use by pedestrians who are struck by motor vehicles: How drinking influences behaviors, medical management, and outcomes', Journal of Trauma - Injury, Infection and Critical Care, vol. 71, no. 5, pp. 1252-1257. https://doi.org/10.1097/TA.0b013e3182327c94
Dultz, Linda A. ; Frangos, Spiros ; Foltin, George ; Marr, Mollie ; Simon, Ronald ; Bholat, Omar ; Levine, Deborah A. ; Slaughter-Larkem, Dekeya ; Jacko, Sally ; Ayoung-Chee, Patricia ; Pachter, H. Leon. / Alcohol use by pedestrians who are struck by motor vehicles : How drinking influences behaviors, medical management, and outcomes. In: Journal of Trauma - Injury, Infection and Critical Care. 2011 ; Vol. 71, No. 5. pp. 1252-1257.
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abstract = "Background: Injuries to pedestrians struck by motor vehicles represent a significant public health hazard in large cities. The purpose of this study is to investigate the demographics of alcohol users who are struck by motor vehicles and to assess the effects of alcohol on pedestrian crossing patterns, medical management, and outcomes. Methods: Data were prospectively collected between December 2008 to September 2010 on all pedestrians who presented to a Level I trauma center after being struck by a motor vehicle. Variables were obtained by interviewing patients, scene witnesses, first responders, and medical records. Results: Pedestrians who used alcohol were less likely to cross the street in the crosswalk with the signal (22.6{\%} vs. 64.7{\%}) and more likely to cross either in the crosswalk against the signal (22.6{\%} vs. 12.4{\%}) or midblock (54.8{\%} vs. 22.8{\%}). Alcohol use was associated with more initial computed tomography imaging studies compared with no alcohol involvement. Alcohol use was associated with a higher Injury Severity Score (8.82 vs. 4.85; p < 0.001) and hospital length of stay (3.89 days vs. 1.82 days; p < 0.001) compared with those with no alcohol involvement. Patients who used alcohol had a lower average Glasgow Coma Scale score (13.80 vs. 14.76; p < 0.001) and a higher rate of head and neck, face, chest, abdomen, and extremity/pelvic girdle injuries (based on Abbreviated Injury Scale) than those with no alcohol involvement. Conclusion: Alcohol use is a significant risk factor for pedestrians who are struck by motor vehicles. These patients are more likely to cross the street in an unsafe manner and sustain more serious injuries. Traffic safety and injury prevention programs must address irresponsible alcohol use by pedestrians.",
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AU - Dultz, Linda A.

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AU - Foltin, George

AU - Marr, Mollie

AU - Simon, Ronald

AU - Bholat, Omar

AU - Levine, Deborah A.

AU - Slaughter-Larkem, Dekeya

AU - Jacko, Sally

AU - Ayoung-Chee, Patricia

AU - Pachter, H. Leon

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N2 - Background: Injuries to pedestrians struck by motor vehicles represent a significant public health hazard in large cities. The purpose of this study is to investigate the demographics of alcohol users who are struck by motor vehicles and to assess the effects of alcohol on pedestrian crossing patterns, medical management, and outcomes. Methods: Data were prospectively collected between December 2008 to September 2010 on all pedestrians who presented to a Level I trauma center after being struck by a motor vehicle. Variables were obtained by interviewing patients, scene witnesses, first responders, and medical records. Results: Pedestrians who used alcohol were less likely to cross the street in the crosswalk with the signal (22.6% vs. 64.7%) and more likely to cross either in the crosswalk against the signal (22.6% vs. 12.4%) or midblock (54.8% vs. 22.8%). Alcohol use was associated with more initial computed tomography imaging studies compared with no alcohol involvement. Alcohol use was associated with a higher Injury Severity Score (8.82 vs. 4.85; p < 0.001) and hospital length of stay (3.89 days vs. 1.82 days; p < 0.001) compared with those with no alcohol involvement. Patients who used alcohol had a lower average Glasgow Coma Scale score (13.80 vs. 14.76; p < 0.001) and a higher rate of head and neck, face, chest, abdomen, and extremity/pelvic girdle injuries (based on Abbreviated Injury Scale) than those with no alcohol involvement. Conclusion: Alcohol use is a significant risk factor for pedestrians who are struck by motor vehicles. These patients are more likely to cross the street in an unsafe manner and sustain more serious injuries. Traffic safety and injury prevention programs must address irresponsible alcohol use by pedestrians.

AB - Background: Injuries to pedestrians struck by motor vehicles represent a significant public health hazard in large cities. The purpose of this study is to investigate the demographics of alcohol users who are struck by motor vehicles and to assess the effects of alcohol on pedestrian crossing patterns, medical management, and outcomes. Methods: Data were prospectively collected between December 2008 to September 2010 on all pedestrians who presented to a Level I trauma center after being struck by a motor vehicle. Variables were obtained by interviewing patients, scene witnesses, first responders, and medical records. Results: Pedestrians who used alcohol were less likely to cross the street in the crosswalk with the signal (22.6% vs. 64.7%) and more likely to cross either in the crosswalk against the signal (22.6% vs. 12.4%) or midblock (54.8% vs. 22.8%). Alcohol use was associated with more initial computed tomography imaging studies compared with no alcohol involvement. Alcohol use was associated with a higher Injury Severity Score (8.82 vs. 4.85; p < 0.001) and hospital length of stay (3.89 days vs. 1.82 days; p < 0.001) compared with those with no alcohol involvement. Patients who used alcohol had a lower average Glasgow Coma Scale score (13.80 vs. 14.76; p < 0.001) and a higher rate of head and neck, face, chest, abdomen, and extremity/pelvic girdle injuries (based on Abbreviated Injury Scale) than those with no alcohol involvement. Conclusion: Alcohol use is a significant risk factor for pedestrians who are struck by motor vehicles. These patients are more likely to cross the street in an unsafe manner and sustain more serious injuries. Traffic safety and injury prevention programs must address irresponsible alcohol use by pedestrians.

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