Alcohol-related problems and public hospitals: Defining a new role in prevention

D. H. Jernigan, J. F. Mosher, D. F. Reed

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Application of the public health model of primary prevention to the prevention of alcohol-related problems suggests that public hospitals can be significant partners in community-based prevention efforts. Injury and illness related to alcohol use place a high level of demand on public hospital resources, and their participation in prevention efforts is a promising and underutilized way of reducing this demand. Avenues of participation in prevention include improved data collection and reporting, identification and referral of problem-drinking patients, greater dissemination of data on alcohol-related problems to the general public, liaison with victim assistance groups and community-based alcohol-problem prevention organizations, involvement in public policy regarding alcohol use, and the development of prevention messages from a medical perspective. Implementing some or all of these approaches can be done with little extra cost, through using local government alcohol program staff and resources, integration of alcohol-related problem prevention issues into staff training, liaison with professional educational institutions with expertise on alcohol, networking with alcohol policy organizations, incentives for staff participation in health-related professional organizations giving alcohol policy issues higher priority, and the development of a permanent on-site prevention component.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)324-352
Number of pages29
JournalJournal of Public Health Policy
Volume10
Issue number3
StatePublished - 1989
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Public Hospitals
alcohol
Alcohols
staff
participation
Government Programs
Organizations
Local Government
demand
professional association
Primary Prevention
Public Policy
educational institution
resources
Drinking
community
networking
Motivation
expertise
Research Design

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Nursing(all)
  • Health(social science)
  • Health Professions(all)

Cite this

Jernigan, D. H., Mosher, J. F., & Reed, D. F. (1989). Alcohol-related problems and public hospitals: Defining a new role in prevention. Journal of Public Health Policy, 10(3), 324-352.

Alcohol-related problems and public hospitals : Defining a new role in prevention. / Jernigan, D. H.; Mosher, J. F.; Reed, D. F.

In: Journal of Public Health Policy, Vol. 10, No. 3, 1989, p. 324-352.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Jernigan, DH, Mosher, JF & Reed, DF 1989, 'Alcohol-related problems and public hospitals: Defining a new role in prevention', Journal of Public Health Policy, vol. 10, no. 3, pp. 324-352.
Jernigan, D. H. ; Mosher, J. F. ; Reed, D. F. / Alcohol-related problems and public hospitals : Defining a new role in prevention. In: Journal of Public Health Policy. 1989 ; Vol. 10, No. 3. pp. 324-352.
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