Alcohol for surgical scrubbing?

E. L. Larson, Arlene Manns Butz, D. L. Gullette, B. A. Laughon

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

To test the effects of four surgical scrub products on colonizing hand flora, 60 healthy adult volunteers were assigned by block randomization (12 subjects per group) to use one of the following formulations: 70% ethyl alcohol with 0.5% chlorhexidine gluconate (ALC); a liquid detergent base containing 1% triclosan (TRI); a liquid detergent base containing 4% chlorhexidine gluconate (CHG); a liquid detergent base containing 7.5% povidone-iodine (PI); or a nonantimicrobial liquid soap (control). Using standard protocol, subjects performed a surgical scrub daily for five consecutive days. Hand cultures were obtained at baseline and on test days 1 and 5 immediately after the scrub and following four hours of gloving. After the first and last scrubs, ALC, CHG and PI resulted in significant reductions in colonizing flora when compared to the control. Additionally, by day 5 ALC was associated with an almost 3-log reduction as compared to an approximate 1.5-log reduction for CHG and PI and less than a 1-log reduction of TRI and the control (p = .009). After four hours of gloving on both days 1 and 5, microbial counts on hands of subjects using ALC, TRI and CHG were significantly lower than counts for the control (p less than .001), whereas there was no significant difference in counts between the PI and control groups (p = .41). Skin assessment by study subjects rated products from least to most harsh as follows: control, TRI, CHG, ALC and PI p = .00001). It was concluded that ALC could be an efficacious and acceptable alternative for surgical scrubbing.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)139-143
Number of pages5
JournalInfection Control and Hospital Epidemiology
Volume11
Issue number3
StatePublished - Mar 1990

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Hand Disinfection
Povidone-Iodine
Triclosan
Alcohols
Detergents
Hand
Soaps
Random Allocation
chlorhexidine gluconate
Healthy Volunteers
Ethanol
Control Groups
Skin

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology

Cite this

Larson, E. L., Butz, A. M., Gullette, D. L., & Laughon, B. A. (1990). Alcohol for surgical scrubbing? Infection Control and Hospital Epidemiology, 11(3), 139-143.

Alcohol for surgical scrubbing? / Larson, E. L.; Butz, Arlene Manns; Gullette, D. L.; Laughon, B. A.

In: Infection Control and Hospital Epidemiology, Vol. 11, No. 3, 03.1990, p. 139-143.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Larson, EL, Butz, AM, Gullette, DL & Laughon, BA 1990, 'Alcohol for surgical scrubbing?', Infection Control and Hospital Epidemiology, vol. 11, no. 3, pp. 139-143.
Larson EL, Butz AM, Gullette DL, Laughon BA. Alcohol for surgical scrubbing? Infection Control and Hospital Epidemiology. 1990 Mar;11(3):139-143.
Larson, E. L. ; Butz, Arlene Manns ; Gullette, D. L. ; Laughon, B. A. / Alcohol for surgical scrubbing?. In: Infection Control and Hospital Epidemiology. 1990 ; Vol. 11, No. 3. pp. 139-143.
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