Alcohol dementia: 'Cortical' or 'subcortical' dementia?

Cynthia Munro, Judith Saxton, Meryl A. Butters

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Most dementias are considered to exhibit either a predominantly 'cortical' (e.g. Alzheimer's disease, AD) or 'subcortical' (e.g. Parkinson's disease) pattern. A double dissociation has been reported, such that cortical and subcortical dementias can be differentiated based on performance on tests of declarative and procedural learning. The goal of this study was to determine if subjects with alcohol dementia exhibit a predominantly cortical or subcortical dementia profile. The performance of 10 elderly subjects diagnosed with alcohol dementia, 29 elderly subjects with histories of alcohol dependence but who were not demented, and 11 subjects with AD was compared to 20 elderly control subjects. The results indicated that the procedural learning task did not differentiate among the groups, whereas the discriminability index from the California Learning Test (the declarative learning task) did. Thus, alcohol dementia cannot clearly be ascribed to either dementia classification.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)523-533
Number of pages11
JournalArchives of Clinical Neuropsychology
Volume16
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - 2001

Fingerprint

Dementia
Alcohols
Learning
Alzheimer Disease
Dissociative Disorders
Alcoholism
Parkinson Disease

Keywords

  • Alcohol dementia
  • Cortical
  • Subcortical

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology

Cite this

Alcohol dementia : 'Cortical' or 'subcortical' dementia? / Munro, Cynthia; Saxton, Judith; Butters, Meryl A.

In: Archives of Clinical Neuropsychology, Vol. 16, No. 6, 2001, p. 523-533.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Munro, Cynthia ; Saxton, Judith ; Butters, Meryl A. / Alcohol dementia : 'Cortical' or 'subcortical' dementia?. In: Archives of Clinical Neuropsychology. 2001 ; Vol. 16, No. 6. pp. 523-533.
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