Alcohol- and drug-involved driving in the United States: Methodology for the 2007 national roadside survey

John H. Lacey, Tara Kelley-Baker, Robert B. Voas, Eduardo Romano, C. Debra Furr-Holden, Pedro Torres, Amy Berning

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

This article describes the methodology used in the 2007 U.S. National Roadside Survey to estimate the prevalence of alcohol- and drug-impaired driving and alcohol- and drug-involved driving. This study involved randomly stopping drivers at 300 locations across the 48 continental U.S. states at sites selected through a stratified random sampling procedure. Data were collected during a 2-hr Friday daytime session at 60 locations and during 2-hr nighttime weekend periods at 240 locations. Both self-report and biological measures were taken. Biological measures included breath alcohol measurements from 9,413 respondents, oral fluid samples from 7,719 respondents, and blood samples from 3,276 respondents.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)319-353
Number of pages35
JournalEvaluation Review
Volume35
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2011

Keywords

  • alcohol-involved driving
  • drug-involved driving
  • impaired driving
  • roadside survey

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Sciences(all)
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)

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