Age-related skeletal muscle decline is similar in HIV-infected and uninfected individuals

Kevin E. Yarasheski, Rebecca Scherzer, Donald P. Kotier, Adrian S. Dobs, Phyllis C. Tien, Cora E. Lewis, Richard A. Kronmal, Steven B. Heymsfield, Peter Bacchetti, Carl Grunfeld

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: Skeletal muscle (SM) mass decreases with advanced age and with disease in HIV infection. It is unknown whether age-related muscle loss is accelerated in the current era of antiretroviral therapy and which factors might contribute to muscle loss among HIV-infected adults. We hypothesized that muscle mass would be lower and decline faster in HIV-infected adults than in similar-aged controls. Methods: Whole-body 1H-magnetic resonance imaging was used to quantify regional and total SM in 399 HIV-infected and 204 control men and women at baseline and 5 years later. Multivariable regression identified associated factors. Results: At baseline and Year 5, total SM was lower in HIV-infected than control men. HIV-infected women were similar to control women at both time points. After adjusting for demographics, lifestyle factors, and total adipose tissue, HIV infection was associated with lower Year 5 SM in men and higher SM in women compared with controls. Average overall 5-year change in total SM was small and age related, but rate of change was similar in HIV-infected and control men and women. CD4 count and efavirenz use in HIV-infected participants were associated with increasing SM, whereas age and stavudine use were associated with decreasing SM. Conclusions: Muscle mass was lower in HIV-infected men compared with controls, whereas HIV-infected women had slightly higher SM than control women after multivariable adjustment. We found evidence against substantially faster SM decline in HIV infected versus similar-aged controls. SM gain was associated with increasing CD4 count, whereas stavudine use may contribute to SM loss.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)332-340
Number of pages9
JournalJournals of Gerontology - Series A Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences
Volume66 A
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2011

Keywords

  • Body composition
  • Fat redistribution
  • Lipoatrophy
  • Sarcopenia

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Aging
  • Geriatrics and Gerontology

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