Age dependence of clinical and pathological manifestations of autoimmune demyelination: Implications for multiple sclerosis

Mary E. Smith, Nancy L. Eller, Henry F. McFarland, Michael K. Racke, Cedric S. Raine

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

A prominent feature of the clinical spectrum of multiple sclerosis (MS) is its high incidence of onset in the third decade of life and the relative rarity of clinical manifestations during childhood and adolescence, features suggestive of age-related restriction of clinical expression. Experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE), a model of central nervous system (CNS) autoimmune demyelination with many similarities to MS, has a uniform rapid onset and a high incidence of clinical and pathological disease in adult (mature) animals. Like MS, EAE is most commonly seen and studied in female adults. In this study, age-related resistance to clinical EAE has been examined with the adoptive transfer model of EAE in SJL mice that received myelin basic protein-sensitized cells from animals 10 days (sucklings) to 12 weeks (young adults) of age. A variable delay before expression of clinical EAE was observed between the different age groups. The preclinical period was longest in the younger (

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1147-1161
Number of pages15
JournalAmerican Journal of Pathology
Volume155
Issue number4
StatePublished - Oct 1999
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine

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    Smith, M. E., Eller, N. L., McFarland, H. F., Racke, M. K., & Raine, C. S. (1999). Age dependence of clinical and pathological manifestations of autoimmune demyelination: Implications for multiple sclerosis. American Journal of Pathology, 155(4), 1147-1161.