Age- and sex-specific incidence rates of migraine with and without visual aura

Walter F. Stewart, Martha S. Linet, David D. Celentano, Mark Van Natta, Dewey Ziegler

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Age- and sex-specific incidence rates for the onset of migraine headache with and without preceding visual aura were estimated from a population-based telephone interview survey conducted between March 1986 and June 1987 of 10,169 randomly selected residents of Washington County, Maryland, between the ages of 12 and 29 years. A total of 392 males and 1,018 females were identified as having a history of migraine. Of these, 27% of male cases and 28% of female cases were defined as having migraine with visual aura. Among both males and females, the incidence rate for migraine with visual aura appears to have peaked as much as 3-5 years earlier than the age peak for migraine without aura. For males, the age-specific incidence for migraine with visual aura appears to have peaked on or before 5 years of age at 6.6/ 1,000 person-years, or possibly higher. In contrast, the highest incidence for migraine without aura occurred between 10 and 11 years of age at 10.1/1,000 person-years. New cases of migraine were uncommon among males in their late 20s. The initial onset of migraine headache begins at a later age among females than among males. For females, the highest incidence of migraine with aura occurred between 12 and 13 years of age at 14.1/1,000 person-years; the highest incidence for migraine without aura occurred between 14 and 17 years of age at 18.9/1,000 person-years. In contrast to males, new onset of migraine was relatively common among females in theirlate 20s. Am J Epidemiol 1991 ;134:1111 -20.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1111-1120
Number of pages10
JournalAmerican journal of epidemiology
Volume134
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 15 1991

Keywords

  • Incidence
  • Migraine
  • Population

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology

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