Age- and cause-specific childhood mortality in Lombok, Indonesia, as a factor for determining the appropriateness of introducing Haemophilus influenzae type b and pneumococcal vaccines.

C. M. Nelson, A. Sutanto, B. D. Gessner, I. G. Suradana, M. C. Steinhoff, S. Arjoso

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Using age and cause-specific childhood mortality in Lombok, Indonesia, as a factor for determining the appropriateness of introducing Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) and pneumococcal vaccines, the study describes a cross-sectional, hamlet-level mortality survey in 40 of 305 villages in Lombok Island, Indonesia. Causes of death were assessed with a standardized verbal-autopsy questionnaire. One thousand four hundred ninety-nine births and 141 deaths occurring among children aged less than 2 years were identified, with 43% of deaths occurring during the first 2 months of life. The infant mortality rate was 89 (95% CI: 75, 104) per 1,000 live-births. All mortality rates are reported per 1,000 live-births. To examine children whose deaths could potentially have been prevented through vaccination with Hib or pneumococcal vaccine, deaths due to acute respiratory infection (ARI) and central nervous system (CNS) infections among children, aged 2-23 months, were analyzed. ARI and CNS infections caused 58% (mortality rate: 31 per 1,000 live-births; 95% CI: 23, 41) and 17% (mortality rate: 9 per 1,000 live-births; 95% CI: 5, 16), respectively, of all deaths within this age group. Between the ages of 2 and 23 months, 5% of all babies born alive died of ARI, and another 1% died of CNS infections. Our results indicate that current efforts to reduce childhood mortality should focus on reducing ARI and meningitis. These efforts should include evaluating the impact of Hib and pneumococcal vaccines within the routine Expanded Programme on Immunization system.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)131-138
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of health, population, and nutrition
Volume18
Issue number3
StatePublished - Dec 2000

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Food Science
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Health, Toxicology and Mutagenesis

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