African head and neck fellowships

A model for a sustainable impact on head and neck cancer care in developing countries

Johannes J. Fagan, Jeffrey Otiti, Joyce Aswani, Anna Konney, Evelyne S. Diom, Kenneth Baidoo, Paul A. Onakoya, Rajab M. Mugabo, Patrick Noah, Victor Mashamba, Innocent Kundiona, Mainasara Garba, Melesse G. Biadgelign, Chege Macharia, Mesele Bogale, Wayne Martin Koch

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: There is an extreme shortage of head and neck surgeons in Africa. Fourteen head and neck surgeons have completed fellowships in Cape Town and Cameroon. This study determines whether such Africa-based fellowships are a good model for developing countries by making a sustainable impact on head and neck cancer care. Methods: An observational study was conducted by emailing questionnaires to past fellows. Results: All fellows had returned to teaching hospitals in their counties. Seven established new multidisciplinary cancer teams. Head and neck operations had increased by >335%, as had complexity of the surgery. There was effective transfer of surgical skills to trainees. All considered head and neck fellowships to be the best model to grow head and neck care. Conclusion: Head and neck fellowships in developing countries are effective models for establishing training programs and for increasing provision of specialized surgical services in a sustainable fashion.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalHead and Neck
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jan 1 2019

Fingerprint

Head and Neck Neoplasms
Developing Countries
Neck
Head
Cameroon
Teaching Hospitals
Observational Studies
Education
Neoplasms

Keywords

  • Africa
  • developing countries
  • fellowship training
  • head and neck surgery

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Otorhinolaryngology

Cite this

African head and neck fellowships : A model for a sustainable impact on head and neck cancer care in developing countries. / Fagan, Johannes J.; Otiti, Jeffrey; Aswani, Joyce; Konney, Anna; Diom, Evelyne S.; Baidoo, Kenneth; Onakoya, Paul A.; Mugabo, Rajab M.; Noah, Patrick; Mashamba, Victor; Kundiona, Innocent; Garba, Mainasara; Biadgelign, Melesse G.; Macharia, Chege; Bogale, Mesele; Koch, Wayne Martin.

In: Head and Neck, 01.01.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Fagan, JJ, Otiti, J, Aswani, J, Konney, A, Diom, ES, Baidoo, K, Onakoya, PA, Mugabo, RM, Noah, P, Mashamba, V, Kundiona, I, Garba, M, Biadgelign, MG, Macharia, C, Bogale, M & Koch, WM 2019, 'African head and neck fellowships: A model for a sustainable impact on head and neck cancer care in developing countries', Head and Neck. https://doi.org/10.1002/hed.25615
Fagan, Johannes J. ; Otiti, Jeffrey ; Aswani, Joyce ; Konney, Anna ; Diom, Evelyne S. ; Baidoo, Kenneth ; Onakoya, Paul A. ; Mugabo, Rajab M. ; Noah, Patrick ; Mashamba, Victor ; Kundiona, Innocent ; Garba, Mainasara ; Biadgelign, Melesse G. ; Macharia, Chege ; Bogale, Mesele ; Koch, Wayne Martin. / African head and neck fellowships : A model for a sustainable impact on head and neck cancer care in developing countries. In: Head and Neck. 2019.
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AU - Diom, Evelyne S.

AU - Baidoo, Kenneth

AU - Onakoya, Paul A.

AU - Mugabo, Rajab M.

AU - Noah, Patrick

AU - Mashamba, Victor

AU - Kundiona, Innocent

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AB - Background: There is an extreme shortage of head and neck surgeons in Africa. Fourteen head and neck surgeons have completed fellowships in Cape Town and Cameroon. This study determines whether such Africa-based fellowships are a good model for developing countries by making a sustainable impact on head and neck cancer care. Methods: An observational study was conducted by emailing questionnaires to past fellows. Results: All fellows had returned to teaching hospitals in their counties. Seven established new multidisciplinary cancer teams. Head and neck operations had increased by >335%, as had complexity of the surgery. There was effective transfer of surgical skills to trainees. All considered head and neck fellowships to be the best model to grow head and neck care. Conclusion: Head and neck fellowships in developing countries are effective models for establishing training programs and for increasing provision of specialized surgical services in a sustainable fashion.

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