African-American race and antibodies to topoisomerase I are associated with increased severity of scleroderma lung disease

Eric L. Greidinger, Keith T. Flaherty, Barbara White, Antony Rosen, Fredrick Wigley, Robert A Wise

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Study objectives: To determine whether African-American race is independently associated with lung disease in scleroderma. Design: Retrospective review. Setting: University medical center in Baltimore. Patients: One hundred one patients with diffuse cutaneous scleroderma with available serum samples. Measurements: Patients underwent lung function testing as part of their routine clinical care. Percent predicted values adjusted for race were calculated for FVC, single-breath carbon monoxide diffusing capacity (Dco), and FEV1. Serum samples were assayed for the presence of antibodies to topoisomerase I and RNA polymerase II. Results: Scleroderma patients of African-American race had lower percent predicted values than white patients for FVC (p1 (p

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)801-807
Number of pages7
JournalChest
Volume114
Issue number3
StatePublished - 1998

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Type I DNA Topoisomerase
African Americans
Lung Diseases
Antibodies
Diffuse Scleroderma
Baltimore
RNA Polymerase II
Carbon Monoxide
Serum
Lung
Skin

Keywords

  • Autoantibodies
  • Lung disease
  • Race
  • Scleroderma
  • Topoisomerase I

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine

Cite this

African-American race and antibodies to topoisomerase I are associated with increased severity of scleroderma lung disease. / Greidinger, Eric L.; Flaherty, Keith T.; White, Barbara; Rosen, Antony; Wigley, Fredrick; Wise, Robert A.

In: Chest, Vol. 114, No. 3, 1998, p. 801-807.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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