African American HMO enrollees. Their experiences with partner abuse and its effect on their health and use of medical services

Janet Schollenberger, Jacquelyn Campbell, Phyllis W. Sharps, Patricia O'Campo, Andrea Carlson Gielen, Jacqueline Dienemann, Joan Kub

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Intimate partner violence has been demonstrated to be a significant public health problem among African American women. This study provided an opportunity to examine prevalence of intimate partner violence and health consequences among a group of primarily middle-class, employed African American women enrolled in a privately insured HMO (n = 109 abused and 97 never-abused women). Significantly more abused African American women were divorced or widowed and had incomes less than $50,000 a year. Abused women had more health problems (central nervous system, gynecological, STDs, gastrointestinal), more health problems per medical visits, and more emergency room visits (p < .05) compared to never-abused women. The health consequences of abuse and its association with health disparities are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)599-618
Number of pages20
JournalViolence Against Women
Volume9
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2003

Keywords

  • Domestic violence
  • Health consequences
  • Injuries
  • Partner abuse

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Gender Studies
  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Law

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