African-American Cancer Survivors’ Use of Religious Beliefs to Positively Influence the Utilization of Cancer Care

Jill B. Hamilton, Kayoll V. Galbraith, Nakia C. Best, Valarie C. Worthy, L. T.C.Angelo D. Moore

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Among African-Americans, religion impacts health-seeking behaviors. This qualitative study used criterion purposeful sampling and thematic analysis in analysis of data from 31 African-American cancer patients to understand the influence of religion on the utilization of cancer care services. Our findings suggest that religious beliefs and practices positively influenced attitudes toward their illness and ability to endure treatment. God’s ability to heal and cure, God’s control over survival, God’s will over their lives, and God’s promise for health and prosperity were examples of survivor’s religious beliefs. Religious practices such as prayer promoted a trusting relationship with healthcare providers and were a source of strength and encouragement.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1856-1869
Number of pages14
JournalJournal of Religion and Health
Volume54
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 25 2015

Keywords

  • Access to care
  • African-American
  • Cancer
  • Religion
  • Survivorship

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nursing(all)
  • Religious studies

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