Affective processing bias in youth with primary bipolar disorder or primary attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder

Karen E Seymour, Kerri L. Kim, Grace K. Cushman, Megan E. Puzia, Alexandra B. Weissman, Thania Galvan, Daniel P. Dickstein

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

High rates of comorbidity and overlapping diagnostic criteria between pediatric bipolar disorder (BD) and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) contribute to diagnostic and treatment confusion. To advance what is known about both disorders, we compared effect of emotional stimuli on response control in children with primary BD, primary ADHD and typically developing controls (TDC). Participants included 7–17 year olds with either “narrow-phenotype” pediatric BD (n = 25), ADHD (n = 25) or TDC (n = 25). Groups were matched on participant age and FSIQ. The effect of emotional stimuli on response control was assessed using the Cambridge Neuropsychological Test Automated Battery Affective Go/No-Go task (CANTAB AGN). We found a group by target valence interaction on commission errors [F(2,71) = 5.34, p p 2 = 0.13] whereby ADHD, but not TDC participants, made more errors on negative than positive words [t(24) = −2.58, p 

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1349-1359
Number of pages11
JournalEuropean Child and Adolescent Psychiatry
Volume24
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2015

Fingerprint

Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity
Bipolar Disorder
Pediatrics
Confusion
Neuropsychological Tests
Comorbidity
Research Design
Phenotype
Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder
Affective
Therapeutics
Diagnostics
Emotion
Stimulus

Keywords

  • Affective processing
  • Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder
  • Bipolar disorder
  • Child psychiatry
  • Emotion

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Philosophy
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

Cite this

Affective processing bias in youth with primary bipolar disorder or primary attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder. / Seymour, Karen E; Kim, Kerri L.; Cushman, Grace K.; Puzia, Megan E.; Weissman, Alexandra B.; Galvan, Thania; Dickstein, Daniel P.

In: European Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Vol. 24, No. 11, 01.11.2015, p. 1349-1359.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Seymour, Karen E ; Kim, Kerri L. ; Cushman, Grace K. ; Puzia, Megan E. ; Weissman, Alexandra B. ; Galvan, Thania ; Dickstein, Daniel P. / Affective processing bias in youth with primary bipolar disorder or primary attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder. In: European Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. 2015 ; Vol. 24, No. 11. pp. 1349-1359.
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