Adverse stress, hippocampal networks, and Alzheimer's disease

S. M. Rothman, Mark P. Mattson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Recent clinical data have implicated chronic adverse stress as a potential risk factor in the development of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and data also suggest that normal, physiological stress responses may be impaired in AD. It is possible that pathology associated with AD causes aberrant responses to chronic stress, due to potential alterations in the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. Recent study in rodent models of AD suggests that chronic adverse stress exacerbates the cognitive deficits and hippocampal pathology that are present in the AD brain. This review summarizes recent findings obtained in experimental AD models regarding the influence of chronic adverse stress on the underlying cellular and molecular disease processes including the potential role of glucocorticoids. Emerging findings suggest that both AD and chronic adverse stress affect hippocampal neural networks in a similar fashion. We describe alterations in hippocampal plasticity, which occur in both chronic stress and AD including dendritic remodeling, neurogenesis, and long-term potentiation. Finally, we outline potential roles for oxidative stress and neurotrophic factor signaling as the key determinants of the impact of chronic stress on the plasticity of neural networks and AD pathogenesis.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)56-70
Number of pages15
JournalNeuroMolecular Medicine
Volume12
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2010
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Alzheimer Disease
Neuronal Plasticity
Pathology
Physiological Stress
Long-Term Potentiation
Neurogenesis
Nerve Growth Factors
Glucocorticoids
Rodentia
Oxidative Stress
Chronic Disease
Brain

Keywords

  • Alzheimer's disease
  • Chronic stress
  • Glucocorticoids
  • Hippocampal plasticity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience
  • Molecular Medicine
  • Neurology

Cite this

Adverse stress, hippocampal networks, and Alzheimer's disease. / Rothman, S. M.; Mattson, Mark P.

In: NeuroMolecular Medicine, Vol. 12, No. 1, 03.2010, p. 56-70.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Rothman, S. M. ; Mattson, Mark P. / Adverse stress, hippocampal networks, and Alzheimer's disease. In: NeuroMolecular Medicine. 2010 ; Vol. 12, No. 1. pp. 56-70.
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