Advancing the selection of neurodevelopmental measures in epidemiological studies of environmental chemical exposure and health effects

Eric Youngstrom, Judy S. LaKind, Lauren Kenworthy, Paul H. Lipkin, Michael Goodman, Katherine Squibb, Donald R. Mattison, Bruno J. Anthony, Laura Gutermuth Anthony

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

With research suggesting increasing incidence of pediatric neurodevelopmental disorders, questions regarding etiology continue to be raised. Neurodevelopmental function tests have been used in epidemiology studies to evaluate relationships between environmental chemical exposures and neurodevelopmental deficits. Limitations of currently used tests and difficulties with their interpretation have been described, but a comprehensive critical examination of tests commonly used in studies of environmental chemicals and pediatric neurodevelopmental disorders has not been conducted. We provide here a listing and critical evaluation of commonly used neurodevelopmental tests in studies exploring effects from chemical exposures and recommend measures that are not often used, but should be considered. We also discuss important considerations in selecting appropriate tests and provide a case study by reviewing the literature on polychlorinated biphenyls.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)229-268
Number of pages40
JournalInternational journal of environmental research and public health
Volume7
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2010
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Children's health
  • Developmental epidemiology
  • Domain
  • Neurodevelopment
  • Neurodevelopmental measures
  • PCBs
  • Polychlorinated biphenyls
  • Psychometrics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Health, Toxicology and Mutagenesis

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