Advancing nutrition measurement: Developing quantitative measures of nutrition service quality for pregnant women and children in low- and middle-income country health systems

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The health sector plays an important role in the delivery of high-quality nutrition interventions to women and children in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). However, there are no standardized approaches to defining and measuring nutrition service quality in these contexts. This study aims to systematically develop quality of care indices for direct health systems nutrition interventions using a five-step process: (1) identify recommended interventions for inclusion in indices, (2) extract service readiness, provision of care, and experience of care items from intervention-specific clinical guidelines, (3) map items to data available in global health facility surveys, (4) conduct an expert survey to prioritize interventions and items, and (5) use findings from previous steps to propose quality of care metrics. Thirty-two recommended interventions were identified, for which the guidelines review yielded 763 unique items that were reviewed by experts. The proposed nutrition quality of care indices for pregnant women reflects eight interventions and the indices for children under 5 reflects six interventions. The indices provide a standardized measure for nutrition intervention quality and can be operationalized using existing health facility assessment data, facilitating their use by LMIC decision makers for planning and resource allocation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere13279
JournalMaternal and Child Nutrition
Volume18
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2022

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Obstetrics and Gynecology
  • Nutrition and Dietetics
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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