Advanced MRI and staging of multiple sclerosis lesions

Martina Absinta, Pascal Sati, Daniel S. Reich

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Abstract

Over the past few decades, MRI-based visualization of demyelinated CNS lesions has become pivotal to the diagnosis and monitoring of multiple sclerosis (MS). In this Review, we outline current efforts to correlate imaging findings with the pathology of lesion development in MS, and the pitfalls that are being encountered in this research. Multimodal imaging at high and ultra-high magnetic field strengths is yielding biologically relevant insights into the pathophysiology of blood-brain barrier dynamics and both active and chronic inflammation, as well as mechanisms of lesion healing and remyelination. Here, we parallel the results in humans with advances in imaging of a primate model of MS-experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) in the common marmoset-in which demyelinated lesions resemble their human counterparts far more closely than do EAE lesions in the rodent. This approach holds promise for the identification of innovative biological markers, and for next-generation clinical trials that will focus more on tissue protection and repair.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)358-368
Number of pages11
JournalNature Reviews Neurology
Volume12
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2016
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Multiple Sclerosis
Autoimmune Experimental Encephalomyelitis
Multimodal Imaging
Callithrix
Magnetic Fields
Blood-Brain Barrier
Primates
Rodentia
Biomarkers
Clinical Trials
Pathology
Inflammation
Research

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience

Cite this

Advanced MRI and staging of multiple sclerosis lesions. / Absinta, Martina; Sati, Pascal; Reich, Daniel S.

In: Nature Reviews Neurology, Vol. 12, No. 6, 01.06.2016, p. 358-368.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Absinta, Martina ; Sati, Pascal ; Reich, Daniel S. / Advanced MRI and staging of multiple sclerosis lesions. In: Nature Reviews Neurology. 2016 ; Vol. 12, No. 6. pp. 358-368.
@article{d791375e0c73452d835fe359f9022859,
title = "Advanced MRI and staging of multiple sclerosis lesions",
abstract = "Over the past few decades, MRI-based visualization of demyelinated CNS lesions has become pivotal to the diagnosis and monitoring of multiple sclerosis (MS). In this Review, we outline current efforts to correlate imaging findings with the pathology of lesion development in MS, and the pitfalls that are being encountered in this research. Multimodal imaging at high and ultra-high magnetic field strengths is yielding biologically relevant insights into the pathophysiology of blood-brain barrier dynamics and both active and chronic inflammation, as well as mechanisms of lesion healing and remyelination. Here, we parallel the results in humans with advances in imaging of a primate model of MS-experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) in the common marmoset-in which demyelinated lesions resemble their human counterparts far more closely than do EAE lesions in the rodent. This approach holds promise for the identification of innovative biological markers, and for next-generation clinical trials that will focus more on tissue protection and repair.",
author = "Martina Absinta and Pascal Sati and Reich, {Daniel S.}",
year = "2016",
month = "6",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1038/nrneurol.2016.59",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "12",
pages = "358--368",
journal = "Nature Reviews Neurology",
issn = "1759-4758",
publisher = "Nature Publishing Group",
number = "6",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Advanced MRI and staging of multiple sclerosis lesions

AU - Absinta, Martina

AU - Sati, Pascal

AU - Reich, Daniel S.

PY - 2016/6/1

Y1 - 2016/6/1

N2 - Over the past few decades, MRI-based visualization of demyelinated CNS lesions has become pivotal to the diagnosis and monitoring of multiple sclerosis (MS). In this Review, we outline current efforts to correlate imaging findings with the pathology of lesion development in MS, and the pitfalls that are being encountered in this research. Multimodal imaging at high and ultra-high magnetic field strengths is yielding biologically relevant insights into the pathophysiology of blood-brain barrier dynamics and both active and chronic inflammation, as well as mechanisms of lesion healing and remyelination. Here, we parallel the results in humans with advances in imaging of a primate model of MS-experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) in the common marmoset-in which demyelinated lesions resemble their human counterparts far more closely than do EAE lesions in the rodent. This approach holds promise for the identification of innovative biological markers, and for next-generation clinical trials that will focus more on tissue protection and repair.

AB - Over the past few decades, MRI-based visualization of demyelinated CNS lesions has become pivotal to the diagnosis and monitoring of multiple sclerosis (MS). In this Review, we outline current efforts to correlate imaging findings with the pathology of lesion development in MS, and the pitfalls that are being encountered in this research. Multimodal imaging at high and ultra-high magnetic field strengths is yielding biologically relevant insights into the pathophysiology of blood-brain barrier dynamics and both active and chronic inflammation, as well as mechanisms of lesion healing and remyelination. Here, we parallel the results in humans with advances in imaging of a primate model of MS-experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) in the common marmoset-in which demyelinated lesions resemble their human counterparts far more closely than do EAE lesions in the rodent. This approach holds promise for the identification of innovative biological markers, and for next-generation clinical trials that will focus more on tissue protection and repair.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84964692124&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84964692124&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1038/nrneurol.2016.59

DO - 10.1038/nrneurol.2016.59

M3 - Review article

C2 - 27125632

AN - SCOPUS:84964692124

VL - 12

SP - 358

EP - 368

JO - Nature Reviews Neurology

JF - Nature Reviews Neurology

SN - 1759-4758

IS - 6

ER -