Advanced liver fibrosis and care continuum in emergency department patients with chronic hepatitis C

Yu-Hsiang Hsieh, Danielle Signer, Anuj V. Patel, Valentina Viertel, Mustapha Saheed, Risha Irvin, Mark Sulkowski, David L Thomas, Richard Rothman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: FIB-4, a non-invasive serum fibrosis index (which includes age, ALT, AST, and platelet count), is frequently available during ED visits. Our objective was to define 1-year HCV-related care outcomes of ED patients with known HCV, for the overall group, and both those with and without advanced fibrosis. Methods: As part of an ongoing HCV linkage-to-care (LTC) program, HCV-infected ED patients were identified retrospectively via medical record review. Components of FIB-4 were abstracted, and patients with an FIB-4 > 3.25 were classified with advanced fibrosis and characterized with regards to downstream HCV care continuum outcomes at one-year after enrollment. Results: Of the 113 patients with known HCV, 38 (33.6%) had advanced fibrosis. One-year outcomes along the HCV care continuum after ED encounter for ‘all’ 113, 75 ‘without advanced fibrosis’ and 38 ‘advanced fibrosis’ patients, respectively, were as follows: agreeing to be linked to care [106 (93.8%), 72 (96.0%), 34 (89.5%)]; LTC [38 (33.6%), 21 (28.0%), 17 (44.7%)]; treatment initiation among those linked [16 (42.1%), 9 (42.9%), 7 (41.2%)]; sustained virologic response 4 weeks post-treatment among those treated [15 (93.8%), 9 (100.0%), 6 (85.7%)]; documented all-cause mortality [10 (8.8%), 3 (4.0%), 7 (18.4%)]. Notably, 70% of those who died had advanced fibrosis. For those with advanced liver fibrosis, all-cause mortality was significantly higher, than those without (18.4% versus 4.0%, p = 0.030). Conclusions: Over one-third of HCV-infected ED patients have advanced liver fibrosis, incomplete LTC, and higher mortality, suggesting this readily-available FIB-4 might be used to prioritize LTC services for those with advanced fibrosis.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalAmerican Journal of Emergency Medicine
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jan 1 2018

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Keywords

  • CDC recommendations
  • Emergency department
  • HCV
  • HCV testing
  • Undiagnosed infection

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Emergency Medicine

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