Advanced heart failure treated with continuous-flow left ventricular assist device

Mark S. Slaughter, Joseph G. Rogers, Carmelo A. Milano, Stuart D. Russell, John V. Conte, David Feldman, Benjamin Sun, Antone J. Tatooles, Reynolds M. Delgado, James W. Long, Thomas C. Wozniak, Waqas Ghumman, David J. Farrar, O. Howard Frazier

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Patients with advanced heart failure have improved survival rates and quality of life when treated with implanted pulsatile-flow left ventricular assist devices as compared with medical therapy. New continuous-flow devices are smaller and may be more durable than the pulsatile-flow devices. METHODS: In this randomized trial, we enrolled patients with advanced heart failure who were ineligible for transplantation, in a 2:1 ratio, to undergo implantation of a continuous-flow device (134 patients) or the currently approved pulsatile-flow device (66 patients). The primary composite end point was, at 2 years, survival free from disabling stroke and reoperation to repair or replace the device. Secondary end points included survival, frequency of adverse events, the quality of life, and functional capacity. RESULTS: Preoperative characteristics were similar in the two treatment groups, with a median age of 64 years (range, 26 to 81), a mean left ventricular ejection fraction of 17%, and nearly 80% of patients receiving intravenous inotropic agents. The primary composite end point was achieved in more patients with continuous-flow devices than with pulsatile-flow devices (62 of 134 [46%] vs. 7 of 66 [11%]; P

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2241-2251
Number of pages11
JournalNew England Journal of Medicine
Volume361
Issue number23
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 3 2009

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Heart-Assist Devices
Heart Failure
Pulsatile Flow
Equipment and Supplies
Quality of Life
Survival
Reoperation
Stroke Volume
Survival Rate
Transplantation
Stroke
Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Slaughter, M. S., Rogers, J. G., Milano, C. A., Russell, S. D., Conte, J. V., Feldman, D., ... Frazier, O. H. (2009). Advanced heart failure treated with continuous-flow left ventricular assist device. New England Journal of Medicine, 361(23), 2241-2251. https://doi.org/10.1056/NEJMoa0909938

Advanced heart failure treated with continuous-flow left ventricular assist device. / Slaughter, Mark S.; Rogers, Joseph G.; Milano, Carmelo A.; Russell, Stuart D.; Conte, John V.; Feldman, David; Sun, Benjamin; Tatooles, Antone J.; Delgado, Reynolds M.; Long, James W.; Wozniak, Thomas C.; Ghumman, Waqas; Farrar, David J.; Frazier, O. Howard.

In: New England Journal of Medicine, Vol. 361, No. 23, 03.12.2009, p. 2241-2251.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Slaughter, MS, Rogers, JG, Milano, CA, Russell, SD, Conte, JV, Feldman, D, Sun, B, Tatooles, AJ, Delgado, RM, Long, JW, Wozniak, TC, Ghumman, W, Farrar, DJ & Frazier, OH 2009, 'Advanced heart failure treated with continuous-flow left ventricular assist device', New England Journal of Medicine, vol. 361, no. 23, pp. 2241-2251. https://doi.org/10.1056/NEJMoa0909938
Slaughter MS, Rogers JG, Milano CA, Russell SD, Conte JV, Feldman D et al. Advanced heart failure treated with continuous-flow left ventricular assist device. New England Journal of Medicine. 2009 Dec 3;361(23):2241-2251. https://doi.org/10.1056/NEJMoa0909938
Slaughter, Mark S. ; Rogers, Joseph G. ; Milano, Carmelo A. ; Russell, Stuart D. ; Conte, John V. ; Feldman, David ; Sun, Benjamin ; Tatooles, Antone J. ; Delgado, Reynolds M. ; Long, James W. ; Wozniak, Thomas C. ; Ghumman, Waqas ; Farrar, David J. ; Frazier, O. Howard. / Advanced heart failure treated with continuous-flow left ventricular assist device. In: New England Journal of Medicine. 2009 ; Vol. 361, No. 23. pp. 2241-2251.
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AU - Sun, Benjamin

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AU - Ghumman, Waqas

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