Advanced dive monitoring system.

W. I. Sternberger, S. A. Goemmer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The US Navy supports deep diving operations with a variety of mixed-gas life support systems. A systems engineering study was conducted for the Naval Experimental Dive Unit (Panama City, FL) to develop a concept design for an advanced dive monitoring system. The monitoring system is intended primarily to enhance diver safety and secondarily to support diving medicine research. Distinct monitoring categories of diver physiology, life support system, and environment are integrated in the monitoring system. A system concept is proposed that accommodates real-time and quantitative measurements, noninvasive physiological monitoring, and a flexible and expandable implementation architecture. Human factors and ergonomic design considerations have been emphasized to assure that there is no impact on the diver's primary mission. The Navy has accepted the resultant system requirements and the basic design concept. A number of monitoring components have been implemented and successfully support deep diving operations.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)251-258
Number of pages8
JournalLife support & biosphere science : international journal of earth space
Volume6
Issue number3
StatePublished - Jan 1 1999

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Diving
Life Support Systems
Panama
Human Engineering
Physiologic Monitoring
Gases
Medicine
Safety
Research

Cite this

Advanced dive monitoring system. / Sternberger, W. I.; Goemmer, S. A.

In: Life support & biosphere science : international journal of earth space, Vol. 6, No. 3, 01.01.1999, p. 251-258.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Sternberger, WI & Goemmer, SA 1999, 'Advanced dive monitoring system.', Life support & biosphere science : international journal of earth space, vol. 6, no. 3, pp. 251-258.
Sternberger, W. I. ; Goemmer, S. A. / Advanced dive monitoring system. In: Life support & biosphere science : international journal of earth space. 1999 ; Vol. 6, No. 3. pp. 251-258.
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