Adult choledochal cysts: current update on classification, pathogenesis, and cross-sectional imaging findings

Venkata S. Katabathina, Wojciech Kapalczynski, Anil K. Dasyam, Victor Anaya-Baez, Christine O. Menias

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Abstract

Approximately 20% of choledochal cysts (CC) present in adult patients and they are commonly associated with a high risk of complications, including malignancy. Additionally, children who underwent internal drainage procedures for CCs can develop complications during adulthood despite treatment. Concepts regarding classification and pathogenesis of the CCs have been evolving. While new subtypes are being added to the widely accepted Todani classification system, simplified classification schemes have also been proposed to guide appropriate management. The exact etiology of CCs is currently unknown. The two leading theories involve either the presence of an anomalous pancreatico-biliary junction with associated reflux of pancreatic juice into the biliary system or, more recently, some form of antenatal biliary obstruction with resulting proximal bile duct dilation. Imaging studies play an important role in the initial diagnosis, surgical planning, and long-term surveillance of CCs.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1971-1981
Number of pages11
JournalAbdominal Imaging
Volume40
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 12 2015
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Choledochal Cyst
Pancreatic Juice
Biliary Tract
Bile Ducts
Dilatation
Drainage
Neoplasms
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • Adult choledochal cysts
  • Cholangiocarcinoma
  • MDCT
  • MRI

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiological and Ultrasound Technology
  • Medicine(all)
  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Urology
  • Gastroenterology

Cite this

Katabathina, V. S., Kapalczynski, W., Dasyam, A. K., Anaya-Baez, V., & Menias, C. O. (2015). Adult choledochal cysts: current update on classification, pathogenesis, and cross-sectional imaging findings. Abdominal Imaging, 40(6), 1971-1981. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00261-014-0344-1

Adult choledochal cysts : current update on classification, pathogenesis, and cross-sectional imaging findings. / Katabathina, Venkata S.; Kapalczynski, Wojciech; Dasyam, Anil K.; Anaya-Baez, Victor; Menias, Christine O.

In: Abdominal Imaging, Vol. 40, No. 6, 12.08.2015, p. 1971-1981.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Katabathina, VS, Kapalczynski, W, Dasyam, AK, Anaya-Baez, V & Menias, CO 2015, 'Adult choledochal cysts: current update on classification, pathogenesis, and cross-sectional imaging findings', Abdominal Imaging, vol. 40, no. 6, pp. 1971-1981. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00261-014-0344-1
Katabathina, Venkata S. ; Kapalczynski, Wojciech ; Dasyam, Anil K. ; Anaya-Baez, Victor ; Menias, Christine O. / Adult choledochal cysts : current update on classification, pathogenesis, and cross-sectional imaging findings. In: Abdominal Imaging. 2015 ; Vol. 40, No. 6. pp. 1971-1981.
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