Adoption of patient-centered care practices by physicians: Results from a national survey

Anne Marie Audet, Karen Davis, Stephen C. Schoenbaum

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Little is known about the extent to which primary care physicians (PCPs) practice patient-centered care, 1 of the Institute of Medicine's 6 dimensions of quality. This article describes the adoption of patient-centered practice attributes by PCPs. Methods: Mail survey; nationally representative physician sample of 1837 physicians in practice at least 3 years postresidency. Results: Eighty-three percent of PCPs surveyed are in favor of sharing of medical records with patients. Most physicians (87%) support team-based care. But, only 16% of PCPs communicate with their patients via e-mail; only 36% get feedback from their patients. Seventy-four percent of PCPs still experience problems with availability of patients' medical records or test results; less than 50% have adopted patient reminder systems. Thirty-three percent of physicians practicing in groups of 50 or more have adopted 6 to 11 of the 11 patient-centered care practices targeted in the survey compared with 14% of solo physicians. Conclusion: Although some patient-centered care practices have been adopted by most PCPs, other practices have not yet been adopted as broadly, especially those targeting coordination, team-based care, and support from appropriate information systems.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)754-759
Number of pages6
JournalArchives of Internal Medicine
Volume166
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 10 2006
Externally publishedYes

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Patient-Centered Care
Primary Care Physicians
Physicians
Postal Service
Medical Records
Reminder Systems
National Academies of Science, Engineering, and Medicine (U.S.) Health and Medicine Division
Information Systems
Surveys and Questionnaires

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Internal Medicine

Cite this

Adoption of patient-centered care practices by physicians : Results from a national survey. / Audet, Anne Marie; Davis, Karen; Schoenbaum, Stephen C.

In: Archives of Internal Medicine, Vol. 166, No. 7, 10.04.2006, p. 754-759.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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