Adolescent vegetarians: A behavioral profile of a school-based population in minnesota

Dianne Neumark-Sztainer, Mary Story, Michael D. Resnick, Robert W Blum

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective: To compare a population-based sample of vegetarian and nonvegetarian adolescents regarding food intake patterns, disordered eating, and a range of other non-food-related health-compromising and health- promoting behaviors. Design: A cross-sectional school-based survey. Setting: Public schools within nonurban areas of Minnesota. Participants: Adolescents (n=107) aged 12 to 20 years who reported on the Minnesota Adolescent Health Survey that they follow a vegetarian diet and a comparison group of nonvegetarian youth (n=214) matched for sex, age, and ethnicity. The percentage of self-identified vegetarians in the study population was relatively low (0.6%); most of the vegetarians were female (81%). Main Outcome Measures: Food intake patterns, disordered eating (frequent dieting, binge eating, self-induced vomiting, and laxative use), health-compromising behaviors (tobacco, alcohol, and marijuana use and suicide attempts), and health-promoting behaviors (seat belt use, physical activity, and brushing teeth regularly). Results: Vegetarian adolescents were twice as likely to consume fruits and vegetables (P

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)833-838
Number of pages6
JournalArchives of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine
Volume151
Issue number8
StatePublished - Aug 1997
Externally publishedYes

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Eating
Health
Population
Vegetarian Diet
Seat Belts
Laxatives
Bulimia
Cannabis
Health Surveys
Vegetables
Suicide
Tobacco
Vomiting
Fruit
Tooth
Alcohols
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Exercise
Vegetarians

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Adolescent vegetarians : A behavioral profile of a school-based population in minnesota. / Neumark-Sztainer, Dianne; Story, Mary; Resnick, Michael D.; Blum, Robert W.

In: Archives of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine, Vol. 151, No. 8, 08.1997, p. 833-838.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Neumark-Sztainer, Dianne ; Story, Mary ; Resnick, Michael D. ; Blum, Robert W. / Adolescent vegetarians : A behavioral profile of a school-based population in minnesota. In: Archives of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine. 1997 ; Vol. 151, No. 8. pp. 833-838.
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