Adolescent attitudes toward psychiatric medication: The utility of the Drug attitude inventory

Lisa Townsend, Jerry Floersch, Robert L Findling

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Despite the effectiveness of psychotropic treatment for alleviating symptoms of psychiatric disorders, youth adherence to psychotropic medication regimens is low. Adolescent adherence rates range from 10-80% (Swanson, 2003; Cromer & Tarnowski, 1989; Lloyd et al., 1998; Brown, Borden, and Clingerman, 1985; Sleator, 1985) depending on the population and medication studied. Youth with serious mental illness face increased potential for substance abuse, legal problems, suicide attempts, and completed suicide (Birmaher & Axelson, 2006). Nonadherence may increase the potential for negative outcomes. The Drug Attitude Inventory (DAI) was created to measure attitudes toward neuroleptics and to predict adherence in adults (Hogan, Awad, & Eastwood, 1983). No studies have been identified that have used this instrument in adolescent psychiatric populations. The present study was undertaken to evaluate the utility of the DAI for measuring medication attitudes and predicting adherence in adolescents diagnosed with mental health disorders. Method: Structural equation modeling was used to compare the factor structure of the DAI in adults with its factor structure in adolescents. The relationship between adolescent DAI scores and adherence was examined also. Results: The adult factor structure demonstrated only "fair" fit to the adolescent data (RMSEA =.061). Results indicated a low, but significant positive correlation (r =.205, p

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1523-1531
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry and Allied Disciplines
Volume50
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2009
Externally publishedYes

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Psychiatry
Equipment and Supplies
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Suicide
Adolescent Psychiatry
Mental Disorders
Antipsychotic Agents
Population
Substance-Related Disorders
Mental Health

Keywords

  • Adolescence
  • Drug Attitude Inventory
  • Medication
  • Mental health
  • Psychopharmacology
  • Structural equation modeling

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

Cite this

Adolescent attitudes toward psychiatric medication : The utility of the Drug attitude inventory. / Townsend, Lisa; Floersch, Jerry; Findling, Robert L.

In: Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry and Allied Disciplines, Vol. 50, No. 12, 12.2009, p. 1523-1531.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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