Adjustment to residential placement in Alzheimer disease patients: Does premorbid personality matter?

Jason Brandt, Jeffrey R. Campodonico, Jill B. Rich, Lori Baker, Cynthia Steele, Thea Ruff, Alva Baker, Constantine G Lyketsos

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Aim. To evaluate the influence of premorbid personality on adaptation to placement in a long-term care facility. Subjects. Twenty-eight persons with probable Alzheimer disease (AD) residing in an academically affiliated nursing home for 6-9 months. Methods. Premorbid personality was described retrospectively by two informants for each resident using the revised NEO Personality Inventory (NEO-PI-R). Standardized tests and rating scales were used on admission to the facility to assess cognition, mood state, physical dependency and general health. Nurses rated each AD resident's social behaviour, participation in activities and quality of sleep. Results. Poorer adjustment was associated with more severe dementia but better physical health. None of the NEO-PI-R domain scores predicted adjustment. Conclusions. Contrary to popular belief, premorbid personality is relatively inconsequential for an AD patient's adaptation to a long-term care facility.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)509-515
Number of pages7
JournalInternational Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry
Volume13
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1998

Fingerprint

Social Adjustment
Personality
Personality Inventory
Alzheimer Disease
Long-Term Care
Social Participation
Social Behavior
Health
Nursing Homes
Cognition
Dementia
Sleep
Nurses

Keywords

  • Alzheimer disease
  • Behavior disorder
  • Long-term care
  • Nursing home
  • Personality

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geriatrics and Gerontology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Adjustment to residential placement in Alzheimer disease patients : Does premorbid personality matter? / Brandt, Jason; Campodonico, Jeffrey R.; Rich, Jill B.; Baker, Lori; Steele, Cynthia; Ruff, Thea; Baker, Alva; Lyketsos, Constantine G.

In: International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, Vol. 13, No. 8, 08.1998, p. 509-515.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Brandt, Jason ; Campodonico, Jeffrey R. ; Rich, Jill B. ; Baker, Lori ; Steele, Cynthia ; Ruff, Thea ; Baker, Alva ; Lyketsos, Constantine G. / Adjustment to residential placement in Alzheimer disease patients : Does premorbid personality matter?. In: International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry. 1998 ; Vol. 13, No. 8. pp. 509-515.
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