Adherence to antiretroviral regimens in HIV-infected patients: results of a survey among physicians and patients.

J. E. Gallant, D. S. Block

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

A DuPont Merck survey of patients and physicians addresses the issues of adherence to complex HIV antiretroviral therapy and suggests that simpler regimens could improve adherence. Adherence is not related to income, social class, occupation, or educational background and these are, therefore, not predictive parameters; however, the number of doses in the daily drug regimen and past adherence rates are predictive of compliance. Adherence is shown to be much higher with once- or twice-daily dosing regimens, and significantly lower with three- and four-times daily dosing. Complex food requirements may also contribute to adherence problems. Tables provide statistics on various dosing regimens for HIV infection, responses to the seriousness of adherence problems, and patients' reasons for not adhering to their drug regimens. Also included in the tables are the way length of therapy affects adherence parameters and physician and patient responses on how regimen adherence can be improved.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)32-35
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of the International Association of Physicians in AIDS Care
Volume4
Issue number5
StatePublished - 1998

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